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How Does Analysis Cure?
by Heinz Kohut
edited by Arnold Goldberg
University of Chicago Press, 1984
Cloth: 978-0-226-45034-6 | Paper: 978-0-226-00600-0 | eISBN: 978-0-226-00614-7
Library of Congress Classification BF697.K64 1984
Dewey Decimal Classification 616.8917

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
The Austro-American psychoanalyst Heinz Kohut was one of the foremost leaders in his field and developed the school of self-psychology, which sets aside the Freudian explanations for behavior and looks instead at self/object relationships and empathy in order to shed light on human behavior. In How Does Analysis Cure? Kohut presents the theoretical framework for self-psychology, and carefully lays out how the self develops over the course of time. Kohut also specifically defines healthy and unhealthy cases of Oedipal complexes and narcissism, while investigating the nature of analysis itself as treatment for pathologies. This in-depth examination of “the talking cure” explores the lesser studied phenomena of psychoanalysis, including when it is beneficial for analyses to be left unfinished, and the changing definition of “normal.”

An important work for working psychoanalysts, this book is important not only for psychologists, but also for anyone interested in the complex inner workings of the human psyche.

See other books on: Goldberg, Arnold | Kohut, Heinz | Movements | Psychoanalysis | Self
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