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Satires and Epistles
by Horace
translated by Smith Palmer Bovie
University of Chicago Press, 1959
Paper: 978-0-226-06777-3 | Cloth: 978-0-226-06776-6

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
The writings of Horace have exerted strong and continuing influence on writers from his day to our own. Sophisticated and intellectual, witty and frank, he speaks to the cultivated and civilized world of today with the same astringent candor and sprightliness that appeared so fresh at the height of Rome's wealthy and glory.

The Satires and Epistles spans the poet's career as a satirist, critic, and master of lyric poetry, as man of the world, friend of the great, and relentless enemy of the mediocre. "Horace," writes translator Smith Palmer Bovie, "is the best antidote in the world for anxiety. His Satires and Epistles demonstrate the good-humored freedom of a man who has cheerfully assumed the responsibility for making his own life not so much a 'success' as the occasion for a true enjoyment of virtue and knowledge." Bovie's impeccable translation, along with Clancy's edition of the Odes and Epodes, offers the reader a complete and modern Horace.

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