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One Kind of Everything: Poem and Person in Contemporary America
by Dan Chiasson
University of Chicago Press, 2007
Cloth: 978-0-226-10381-5 | Paper: 978-0-226-10383-9 | eISBN: 978-0-226-10384-6
Library of Congress Classification PS323.5.C485 2007
Dewey Decimal Classification 811.509353

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ABOUT THIS BOOK

One Kind of Everything elucidates the uses of autobiography and constructions of personhood in American poetry since World War II, with helpful reference to American literature in general since Emerson. Taking on one of the most crucial issues in American poetry of the last fifty years, celebrated poet Dan Chiasson explores what is lost or gained when real-life experiences are made part of the subject matter and source material for poetry. In five extended, scholarly essays—on Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Frank Bidart, Frank O’Hara, and Louise Glück—Chiasson looks specifically to bridge the chasm between formal and experimental poetry in the United States. Regardless of form, Chiasson argues that recent American poetry is most thoughtful when it engages most forcefully with autobiographical material, either in an effort to embrace it or denounce it.


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