Accusatory Practices: Denunciation in Modern European History, 1789-1989
edited by Sheila Fitzpatrick and Robert Gellately
University of Chicago Press, 1997
Cloth: 978-0-226-25273-5 | Paper: 978-0-226-25274-2
Library of Congress Classification KJC9520.A89 1997
Dewey Decimal Classification 363.252

ABOUT THIS BOOK | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
"Produced by religious intolerance, political fanaticism, or social resentment, denunciation is a modern democratic practice too long neglected by historians. This fascinating book, written by excellent specialists, establishes a first inventory of this practice, leading the reader through the revolutionary and counter-revolutionary cultures of the last two centuries."—Francois Furet

"This is a fascinating and highly original exploration of a familiar, though poorly understood, phenomenon of modern societies in general and totalitarian systems in particular. From the French Revolution to the NKVD, Gestapo, and Stasi, denunciation is analyzed both as a function of political surveillance and as deeply rooted in the social practices of community and the workplace. The book represents a refreshing amalgam of deeply archival research and theoretical rigor."—Norman M. Naimark, Stanford University


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