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Victorian Science in Context
edited by Bernard Lightman
University of Chicago Press, 1997
eISBN: 978-0-226-48110-4 | Cloth: 978-0-226-48111-1 | Paper: 978-0-226-48112-8
Library of Congress Classification Q127.G4V45 1997
Dewey Decimal Classification 306.45094109034

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Victorians were fascinated by the flood of strange new worlds that science was opening to them. Exotic plants and animals poured into London from all corners of the Empire, while revolutionary theories such as the radical idea that humans might be descended from apes drew crowds to heated debates. Men and women of all social classes avidly collected scientific specimens for display in their homes and devoured literature about science and its practitioners.

Victorian Science in Context captures the essence of this fascination, charting the many ways in which science influenced and was influenced by the larger Victorian culture. Contributions from leading scholars in history, literature, and the history of science explore questions such as: What did science mean to the Victorians? For whom was Victorian science written? What ideological messages did it convey? The contributors show how practical concerns interacted with contextual issues to mold Victorian science—which in turn shaped much of the relationship between modern science and culture.

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