An Artist's Journey: Lettres d'un bachelier es musique, 1835-1841
by Franz Liszt
translated by Charles Suttoni
University of Chicago Press, 1989
Cloth: 978-0-226-48510-2
Library of Congress Classification ML410.L7A3 1989
Dewey Decimal Classification 780.924

ABOUT THIS BOOK | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
In these eloquent and intensely personal writings, Franz Liszt sketches the cities, people, and scenes of his travels in the 1830s and explores ideas about art and its ideal place in the world. During six years of wandering through Switzerland, France, Italy, Austria, and Germany (four of them together with Countess Marie d'Agoult), the composer saw the greatest art and most fabulous landscapes of Europe and crossed paths with celebrated singers and artists, renowned intellectuals, infamous socialites, and both reigning and deposed aristocracy. The article/essays that emerged from this period are both public and private: though written for the Paris press, they are the closest that Liszt came to autobiography. Some of these writings are travel articles; some are essentially reports of a music correspondent; still others are personal and confessional; and some are really essays on the nature of art. All offer precious insight into the musical, social, and intellectual life in the major European capitals seen through the eyes of one of the most well-read and influential musical personalities of the period.

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