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William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s
by Saree Makdisi
University of Chicago Press, 2003
Cloth: 978-0-226-50259-5 | Paper: 978-0-226-50260-1 | eISBN: 978-0-226-50261-8
Library of Congress Classification PR4148.P6M35 2003
Dewey Decimal Classification 821.7

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Modern scholars often find it difficult to account for the profound eccentricities in the work of William Blake, dismissing them as either ahistorical or simply meaningless. But with this pioneering study, Saree Makdisi develops a reliable and comprehensive framework for understanding these peculiarities. According to Makdisi, Blake's poetry and drawings should compel us to reconsider the history of the 1790s. Tracing for the first time the many links among economics, politics, and religion in his work, Makdisi shows how Blake questioned and even subverted the commercial, consumerist, and political liberties that his contemporaries championed, all while developing his own radical aesthetic.

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