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Oduduwa's Chain: Locations of Culture in the Yoruba-Atlantic
by Andrew Apter
University of Chicago Press, 2017
Paper: 978-0-226-50641-8 | Cloth: 978-0-226-50638-8 | eISBN: 978-0-226-50655-5
Library of Congress Classification BL2480.Y6A78 2017
Dewey Decimal Classification 299.68333

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Yoruba culture has been a part of the Americas for centuries, brought from Africa during the transatlantic slave trade and maintained in various forms ever since. In Oduduwa’s Chain, Andrew Apter explores a wide range of fascinating historical and ethnographic examples and offers a provocative rethinking of African heritage in Black Atlantic Studies.
 
Focusing on Yoruba history and culture in Nigeria, Apter applies a generative model of cultural revision that allows him to identify formative Yoruba influences without resorting to the idea that culture and tradition are fixed. For example, Apter shows how the association of African gods with Catholic saints can be seen as a strategy of empowerment, explores historical locations of Yoruba gender ideologies and their variations in the Atlantic world, and much more. He concludes with a rousing call for a return to Africa in studies of the Black Atlantic, resurrecting a critical notion of culture that allows us to transcend Western inventions of African while taking them into account.

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