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Great Expectations: Marriage and Divorce in Post-Victorian America
by Elaine Tyler May
University of Chicago Press, 1983
Paper: 978-0-226-51170-2 | Cloth: 978-0-226-51166-5
Library of Congress Classification HQ536.M37
Dewey Decimal Classification 306.80973

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the divorce rate in the United States rose by a staggering 2,000 percent. To understand this dramatic rise, Elaine Tyler May studied over one thousand detailed divorce cases. She found that contrary to common assumptions, divorce was not simply a by-product of women's increasing economic and sexual independence, or a rebellion against marriage. Rather, thwarted hopes for fulfillment in the public sphere drove both men and women to wed at a greater rate and to bring higher expectations to their marriages.

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