cover of book
 

Magic's Reason: An Anthropology of Analogy
by Graham M. Jones
University of Chicago Press, 2017
eISBN: 978-0-226-51871-8 | Cloth: 978-0-226-51854-1 | Paper: 978-0-226-51868-8
Library of Congress Classification BF1621.J66 2017
Dewey Decimal Classification 306.4

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
In Magic’s Reason, Graham M. Jones tells the entwined stories of anthropology and entertainment magic. The two pursuits are not as separate as they may seem at first. As Jones shows, they not only matured around the same time, but they also shared mutually reinforcing stances toward modernity and rationality. It is no historical accident, for example, that colonial ethnographers drew analogies between Western magicians and native ritual performers, who, in their view, hoodwinked gullible people into believing their sleight of hand was divine.

Using French magicians’ engagements with North African ritual performers as a case study, Jones shows how magic became enshrined in anthropological reasoning. Acknowledging the residue of magic’s colonial origins doesn’t require us to dispense with it. Rather, through this radical reassessment of classic anthropological ideas, Magic’s Reason develops a new perspective on the promise and peril of cross-cultural comparison. 

See other books on: Analogy | Anthropology | Cultural & Social | Magic | Social aspects
See other titles from University of Chicago Press

Reference metadata exposed for Zotero via unAPI.