cover of book
 

The Microsoft Case: Antitrust, High Technology, and Consumer Welfare
by William H. Page and John E. Lopatka
University of Chicago Press, 2007
Cloth: 978-0-226-64463-9 | eISBN: 978-0-226-64465-3 | Paper: 978-0-226-64464-6
Library of Congress Classification KF228.U5P34 2007
Dewey Decimal Classification 345.730268

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ABOUT THIS BOOK




In 1998, the United States Department of Justice and state antitrust agencies charged that Microsoft was monopolizing the market for personal computer operating systems.  More than ten years later, the case is still the defining antitrust litigation of our era.  William H. Page and John E. Lopatka’s The Microsoft Case contributes to the debate over the future of antitrust policy by examining the implications of the litigation from the perspective of consumer welfare. 


The authors trace the development of the case from its conceptual origins through the trial and the key decisions on both liability and remedies.  They argue that, at critical points, the legal system failed consumers by overrating government’s ability to influence outcomes in a dynamic market. This ambitious book is essential reading for business, law, and economics scholars as well as anyone else interested in the ways that technology, economics, and antitrust law have interacted in the digital age.


“This book will become the gold standard for analysis of the monopolization cases against Microsoft. . . . No serious student of law or economic policy should go without reading it.”—Thomas C. Arthur, Emory University






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