cover of book
 

Southern Labor and Black Civil Rights: ORGANIZING MEMPHIS WORKERS
by Michael K. Honey
University of Illinois Press, 1993
Cloth: 978-0-252-02000-1 | Paper: 978-0-252-06305-3
Library of Congress Classification HD6519.M45H66 1993
Dewey Decimal Classification 331.639607307682

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Southern Labor and Black Civil Rights chronicles the rarely studied southern industrial union movement from the Great Depression to the cold war, using the strategically located river city of Memphis as a case study. Michael Honey analyzes the economic basis of segregation and the denial of fundamental human rights and civil liberties it entailed.
Frequently telling his story through personal portraits of those directly involved, Honey documents the dramatic labor battles and sometimes heroic activities of organizers and ordinary workers that helped to set the stage for segregation's demise. His study of interracial industrial union organizing locates some of the roots of the 1960s civil rights struggles in this earlier era. Honey provides a new context for understanding Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1968 campaign in support of poor people and black labor organizing in Memphis.
This detailed account provides a fresh perspective on African-American, labor, civil rights, and southern history. It clarifies the relationship between labor and civil rights struggles, deepens our understanding of the role of racism in blocking working-class advancement, and emphasizes the importance of southern interracial organizing to the history of social movements in the United States.
 
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