All Manners of Food: Eating and Taste in England and France from the Middle Ages to the Present
by Stephen Mennell
University of Illinois Press, 1985
Paper: 978-0-252-06490-6
Library of Congress Classification GT2853.G7M46 1996
Dewey Decimal Classification 394.1094

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY
ABOUT THIS BOOK
So close geographically, how could France and England be so enormously far apart gastronomically? Not just in different recipes and ways of cooking, but in their underlying attitudes toward the enjoyment of eating and its place in social life. In a new afterword that draws the United States and other European countries into the food fight, Stephen Mennell also addresses the rise of Asian influence and "multicultural" cuisine.
Debunking myths along the way, All Manners of Food is a sweeping look at how social and political development has helped to shape different culinary cultures. Food and almost everything to do with food, fasting and gluttony, cookbooks, women's magazines, chefs and cooks, types of foods, the influential difference between "court" and "country" food are comprehensively explored and tastefully presented in a dish that will linger in the memory long after the plates have been cleared.
     
 

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