cover of book
 

Making Lemonade out of Lemons: Mexican American Labor and Leisure in a California Town 1880-1960
by José Alamillo
University of Illinois Press, 2006
Cloth: 978-0-252-03081-9 | Paper: 978-0-252-07325-0
Library of Congress Classification F869.C79A53 2006
Dewey Decimal Classification 979.4970046872

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK

Out of the “lemons” handed to Mexican American workers in Corona, California--low pay, segregated schooling, inadequate housing, and racial discrimination--Mexican men and women made “lemonade” by transforming leisure spaces such as baseball games, parades, festivals, and churches into politicized spaces where workers voiced their grievances, debated strategies for  advancement, and built solidarity. Using oral history interviews, extensive citrus company records, and his own experiences in Corona, José Alamillo argues that Mexican Americans helped lay the groundwork for civil rights struggles and electoral campaigns in the post-World War II era.


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