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Disrupting Kinship: Transnational Politics of Korean Adoption in the United States
by Kimberly D. McKee
University of Illinois Press, 2019
eISBN: 978-0-252-05112-8 | Cloth: 978-0-252-04228-7 | Paper: 978-0-252-08405-8
Library of Congress Classification HV875.64.M35 2019
Dewey Decimal Classification 362.734089957073

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Since the Korean War began, Western families have adopted more than 200,000 Korean children. Two-thirds of these adoptees found homes in the United States. The majority joined white families and in the process forged a new kind of transnational and transracial kinship.

Kimberly D. McKee examines the growth of the neocolonial, multi-million-dollar global industry that shaped these families—a system she identifies as the transnational adoption industrial complex. As she shows, an alliance of the South Korean welfare state, orphanages, adoption agencies, and American immigration laws powered transnational adoption between the two countries. Adoption became a tool to supplement an inadequate social safety net for South Korea's unwed mothers and low-income families. At the same time, it commodified children, building a market that allowed Americans to create families at the expense of loving, biological ties between Koreans. McKee also looks at how Christian Americanism, South Korean welfare policy, and other facets of adoption interact with and disrupt American perceptions of nation, citizenship, belonging, family, and ethnic identity.

Nearby on shelf for Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology / Protection, assistance and relief / Special classes: