cover of book
 

Other Germans: Black Germans and the Politics of Race, Gender, and Memory in the Third Reich
by Tina Marie Campt
University of Michigan Press, 2005
Cloth: 978-0-472-11360-6 | eISBN: 978-0-472-02160-4 | Paper: 978-0-472-03138-2
Library of Congress Classification DD78.B55C36 2004
Dewey Decimal Classification 943.00496

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
It's hard to imagine an issue or image more riveting than Black Germans during the Third Reich. Yet accounts of their lives are virtually nonexistent, despite the fact that they lived through a regime dedicated to racial purity.

 

Tina Campt's Other Germans tells the story of this largely forgotten group of individuals, with important distinctions from other accounts. Most strikingly, Campt centers her arguments on race, rather than anti-semitism. She also provides oral history as background for her study, interviewing two Black Germans for the book.

 

In the end, the author comes face to face with an inevitable question: Is there a relationship between the history of Black Germans and those of other black communities?

 

The answers to Campt's questions make Other Germans essential reading in the emerging study of what it meant to be black and German in the context of a society that looked at anyone with non-German blood as racially impure at best.

See other books on: Africans | Black | Blacks | Race identity | Third Reich
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