cover of book

The Rules of Federalism
by R. Daniel KELEMEN
Harvard University Press, 2004
eISBN: 978-0-674-03942-1 | Cloth: 978-0-674-01309-4
Library of Congress Classification GE170.K45 2004
Dewey Decimal Classification 363.7056094


This book examines patterns of environmental regulation in the European Union and four federal polities--the United States, Germany, Australia, and Canada. Daniel Kelemen develops a theory of regulatory federalism based on his comparative study, arguing that the greater the fragmentation of power at the federal level, the less discretion is allotted to component states. Kelemen's analysis offers a novel perspective on the EU and demonstrates that the EU already acts as a federal polity in the regulatory arena.

In The Rules of Federalism, Kelemen shows that both the structure of the EU's institutions and the control these institutions exert over member states closely resemble the American federal system, with its separation of powers, large number of veto points, and highly detailed, judicially enforceable legislation. In the EU, as in the United States, a high degree of fragmentation in the central government yields a low degree of discretion for member states when it comes to implementing regulatory statutes.

Table of Contents:


1. Regulatory Federalism and the EU
2. Environmental Regulation in the EU
3. Environmental Regulation in the United States
4. Environmental Regulation in Germany
5. Environmental Regulation in Australia and Canada
6. Food and Drug Safety Regulation in the EU
7. Institutional Structure and Regulatory Style

Cases Cited

R. Daniel Kelemen's The Rules of Federalism is an important contribution to both the literature on federalism and on the European Union. It makes an original theoretical and empirical contribution to our understanding of regulatory federalism and sheds new light on the federal systems which it compares. It will open up new avenues of inquiry.
--Alberta Sbragia, University of Pittsburgh

The Rules of Federalism makes a significant contribution to the literature on regulatory federalism. Keleman's original theoretical perspective is made plausible through a series of fascinating case studies. The book will be of interest to scholars of federalism, constitutional design, environmental policy, and the European Union.
--Susan Rose-Ackerman, Yale Law School

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