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Martin Buber's Ontology: An Analysis of I and Thou
by Robert Wood
Northwestern University Press, 1969
Cloth: 978-0-8101-0256-9 | Paper: 978-0-8101-0650-5
Library of Congress Classification BM723.B755W66
Dewey Decimal Classification 181.3

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
At the turn of the century Martin Buber arrived on the philosophic scene. His path to maturity was one long struggle with the problem of unity--in particular with the problem of the unity of spirit and life--and he saw the problem itself to be rooted in the supposition of the primacy of the subject-object relation, with subjects "over here," objects "over there," and their relation a matter of subjects "taking in" objects or, alternatively, constituting them. But Buber moved into a position which undercuts the subject-object dichotomy and initiates a second "Copernican revolution" in philosophical thought.

See other books on: 1878-1965 | Analysis | Buber, Martin | Phenomenology | Thou
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