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Meaning and Mortality in Kierkegaard and Heidegger: Origins of the Existential Philosophy of Death
by Adam Buben
Northwestern University Press, 2016
Cloth: 978-0-8101-3251-1 | Paper: 978-0-8101-3250-4 | eISBN: 978-0-8101-3252-8
Library of Congress Classification BD444.B77 2016
Dewey Decimal Classification 128.5

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Death is one of those few topics that attract the attention of just about every significant thinker in the history of Western philosophy, and this attention has resulted in diverse and complex views on death and what comes after. In Meaning and Mortality, Adam Buben offers a remarkably useful new framework for understanding the ways in which philosophy has discussed death by focusing first on two traditional strains in the discussion, the Platonic and the Epicurean. After providing a thorough account of this ancient dichotomy, he describes the development of an alternative means of handling death in Søren Kierkegaard and Martin Heidegger, whose work on death tends to overshadow Kierkegaard's despite the undeniable influence exerted on him by the nineteenth-century Dane. Buben argues that Kierkegaard and Heidegger prescribe a peculiar way of living with death that offers a kind of compromise between the Platonic and the Epicurean strains.

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