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The Promised Folly
by Judith Hall
Northwestern University Press, 2003
Paper: 978-0-8101-5137-6 | eISBN: 978-0-8101-2154-6 | Cloth: 978-0-8101-5136-9
Library of Congress Classification PS3558.A3695P76 2003
Dewey Decimal Classification 811.54

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
If, as Oscar Wilde said, "nothing ages like happiness," then nothing rejuvenates like a pursuit. That is certainly the American way, and in The Promised Folly, Judith Hall takes a fresh look at our American pursuits and supreme fictions. She explores the folly that follows mere existence and gives it back to her readers in different voices-Venus, Walt Whitman, Julius Caesar, Ma Rainey voices that contain multitudes. Whitman will become Falstaff, for example, and Venus becomes Mars. Absurdities and incongruities such as these constitute for Hall opportunities for lyric pleasure. The resulting poems are puckish, sumptuous, and austere, by turns, and not incidentally compassionate.

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