Every Person's Guide to Antioxidants
by John Smythies
Rutgers University Press, 1998
eISBN: 978-0-8135-5615-4 | Cloth: 978-0-8135-2574-7
Library of Congress Classification RB170.S69 1998
Dewey Decimal Classification 616.07

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY
ABOUT THIS BOOK
What are antioxidants? What do they do? Should you be taking them? How much is enough, or too much? Dr. John Smythies explores these and other questions you need to have answered about antioxidants in Every Person's Guide to Antioxidants.

Oxidants are naturally occuring chemicals in our bodies that derive from oxygen to facilitate essential biochemical processes. However, most oxidants are potentially toxic molecules and the body contains a number of antioxidants for protection against these toxic effects. Overproduction of oxidants, or underproduction of antioxidants, leads to oxidative stress, which has been linked to a wide range of chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's. Smythies thoroughly evaluates current scientific work on this subject and suggests that a high proportion of many of these diseases can be prevented, or their onset delayed, by proper intake of antioxidants. He examines the pros and cons of the debate over how this necessary intake should be achieved, by eating more fruits and vegetables or by taking supplements in pill form. Smythies surveys the toxicity of antioxidants and recommends under what circumstances they should be given with caution or not at all. He also discusses whether taking supplements requires medical supervision and lists good sources of antioxidants in fruits and vegetables
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