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Transitional Justice: Global Mechanisms and Local Realities after Genocide and Mass Violence
edited by Alexander Laban Hinton
introduction by Alexander Laban Hinton
Rutgers University Press, 2011
eISBN: 978-0-8135-8283-2 | Paper: 978-0-8135-5068-8 | Cloth: 978-0-8135-4761-9
Library of Congress Classification JC571.T6994 2010
Dewey Decimal Classification 364.151

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
How do societies come to terms with the aftermath of genocide and mass violence, and how might the international community contribute to this process? Recently, transitional justice mechanisms such as tribunals and truth commissions have emerged as a favored means of redress. Transitional Justice, the first edited collection in anthropology focused directly on this issue, argues that, however well-intentioned, transitional justice needs to more deeply grapple with the complexities of global and transnational involvements and the local on-the-ground realities with which they intersect.Contributors consider what justice means and how it is negotiated in different localities where transitional justice efforts are underway after genocide and mass atrocity. They address a variety of mechanisms, among them, a memorial site in Bali, truth commissions in Argentina and Chile, First Nations treaty negotiations in Canada, violent youth groups in northern Nigeria, the murder of young women in post-conflict Guatemala, and the gacaca courts in Rwanda.
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