cover of book
 

BUY FROM PUBLISHER


Available as an ebook at:
Barnes & Noble Nook



War and Disease: Biomedical Research on Malaria in the Twentieth Century
by Leo Slater
Rutgers University Press, 2009
Cloth: 978-0-8135-4438-0 | eISBN: 978-0-8135-8321-1 | Paper: 978-0-8135-6965-9
Library of Congress Classification RC161.A2S53 2009
Dewey Decimal Classification 362.196936200973

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Malaria is one of the leading killers in the world today. Though drugs against malaria have a long history, attempts to develop novel therapeutics spanned the twentieth century and continue today. In this historical study, Leo B. Slater shows the roots and branches of an enormous drug development project during World War II. Fighting around the globe, American soldiers were at high risk for contracting malaria, yet quinine–a natural cure–became harder to acquire. A U.S. government-funded antimalarial program, initiated by the National Research Council, brought together diverse laboratories and specialists to provide the best drugs to the nation's military. This wartime research would deliver chloroquinine–long the drug of choice for prevention and treatment of malaria–and a host of other chemotherapeutic insights.

A massive undertaking, the antimalarial program was to biomedical research what the Manhattan Project was to the physical sciences.


A volume in the Critical Issues in Health and Medicine series, edited by Rima D. Apple and Janet Golden.



See other books on: Disease | Malaria | Therapeutic use | Treatment | Twentieth Century
See other titles from Rutgers University Press
Nearby on shelf for Internal medicine / Infectious and parasitic diseases: