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Rome: A City out of Print
by Rose Marie San Juan
University of Minnesota Press, 2001
Cloth: 978-0-8166-3791-1
Library of Congress Classification DG807.6.S26 2001
Dewey Decimal Classification 937

ABOUT THIS BOOK | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
An intriguing look at what printed materials tell us about daily life and public space in seventeenth-century Rome.

Focusing on images and descriptions of movement and spectacle-everyday street activities, congregations in market piazzas, life in the Jewish ghetto and the plague hospital, papal and other ceremonial processions, public punishment, and pilgrimage routes-Rose Marie San Juan uncovers the social tensions and conflicts within seventeenth century Roman society that are both concealed within and prompted by mass-produced representations of the city. These depictions of Rome-guidebooks, street posters, broadsheets and brochures, topographic and thematic maps, city views, and collectible images of landmarks and other famous sights-redefined the ways in which public space was experienced, controlled, and utilized, encouraging tourists, pilgrims, and penitents while constraining the activities and movements of women, merchants, dissidents, and Jews.

San Juan contends that the representations of urban space afforded by new print technologies were appropriated by a wide variety of people in the city for purposes that ranged from regulation to opposition. A sophisticated analysis of the contested relations between people, print culture, and urban modernity, Rome: A City Out of Print also offers a rich portrait of the life of the street and the city.

Rose Marie San Juan is associate professor in the Department of Art History, Visual Art, and Theory at the University of British Columbia.

See other books on: In art | Land use, Urban | Print | Public spaces | Rome (Italy)
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