cover of book
 

Mexicans in Wisconsin
by Sergio González
Wisconsin Historical Society Press, 2017
eISBN: 978-0-87020-835-5 | Paper: 978-0-87020-834-8
Library of Congress Classification F395.M5
Dewey Decimal Classification 305.868720775

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY
ABOUT THIS BOOK

From agricultural and factory workers to renowned writers and musicians, the Mexican immigrants who have made their homes in Wisconsin over the past century have become a significant and diverse part of this state’s cultural and economic history. Coming from a variety of educational and professional backgrounds, the earliest Mexican immigrants traveled north in search of better economic opportunities and relief from the violence and economic turmoil of the Mexican Revolution. They found work in tanneries and foundries, and on beet farms where they replaced earlier European immigrant workers who had moved on to family farms. As Mexican immigration has grown to the present day, these families have become integral members of Wisconsin communities, building businesses, support systems, and religious institutions. But their experience has also been riddled with challenges, as they have fought for adequate working conditions, access to education, and acceptance amid widespread prejudice. In this concise history, learn the fascinating stories of this vibrant and resilient immigrant population: from the Tejano migrant workers who traveled north seasonally to work in the state’s cucumber fields, to the determined labor movement led by Jesus Salas, to the young activists of the Chicano Movement, and beyond.



Reference metadata exposed for Zotero via unAPI.