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Little Bit Know Something: Stories in a Language of Anthropology
by Robin Ridington
University of Iowa Press, 1990
Paper: 978-0-87745-286-7 | Cloth: 978-0-87745-268-3 | eISBN: 978-1-58729-203-3
Library of Congress Classification E99.T77R523 1990
Dewey Decimal Classification 299.782

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK

The Dunne-za, the Beaver Indians of British Columbia, say that people who speak from the authority of their experience "little bit know something." This knowledge, which comes through direct experience, dreaming, and the searing transformation of the vision quest, empowers a person to live in this world with intelligence and understanding.

In this sensitive, insightful volume, drawn from over twenty-five years' experience with the Dunne-za Indians, Ridington advocates his unique language of anthology—and in so doing he communicates the themes of cultural and individual knowledge, visionary empowerment, shamanic transformation, and the dialogic basis of ethnographic authority within the evolving context of a humanistic cultural anthropology.


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