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Atlanta: Race, Class And Urban Expansion
by Larry Keating
Temple University Press, 2001
eISBN: 978-1-4399-0449-7 | Paper: 978-1-56639-821-3 | Cloth: 978-1-56639-820-6
Library of Congress Classification HC108.A75K4 2001
Dewey Decimal Classification 305.8009758231

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Atlanta, the epitome of the New South, is a city whose economic growth has transformed it from a provincial capital to a global city, one that could bid for and win the 1996 Summer Olympics. Yet the reality is that the exceptional growth of the region over the last twenty years has exacerbated inequality, particularly for African Americans. Atlanta, the city of Martin Luther King, Jr., remains one of the most segregated cities  in the United States.

Despite African American success in winning the mayor's office and control of the City Council, development plans have remained in the control of private business interests. Keating  tells  a number of  troubling stories. The development of the Underground Atlanta, the construction of the rapid rail system (MARTA), the building of a new stadium for the Braves, the redevelopment of public housing, and the arrangements for the Olympic Games all share a lack of democratic process. Business and political elites ignored protests from neighborhood groups, the interests of the poor, and the advice of planners.

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