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Governing How We Care: Contesting Community and Defining Difference in U.S. Public Health Programs
by Susan J. Shaw
Temple University Press, 2012
Cloth: 978-1-4399-0682-8 | Paper: 978-1-4399-0683-5 | eISBN: 978-1-4399-0684-2
Library of Congress Classification RA445.S454 2012
Dewey Decimal Classification 362.10973

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ABOUT THIS BOOK

As local governments and organizations assume more responsibility for ensuring the public health, identity politics play an increasing yet largely unexamined role in public and policy attitudes toward local problems. In Governing How We Care, medical anthropologist Susan Shaw examines the relationship between government and citizens using case studies of needle exchange and Welfare-to-Work programs to illustrate the meanings of cultural difference, ethnicity, and inequality in health care.

Drawing on ethnographic research conducted over six years in a small New England city, Shaw presents critical perspectives on public health intervention efforts. She looks at online developments in health care and makes important correlations between poverty and health care in the urban United States. Shaw also highlights the new concepts of community and forms of identity that emerge in our efforts to provide effective health care. Governing How We Care shows how government-sponsored community health and health care programs operate in an age of neoliberalism.


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