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Teaching Marianne and Uncle Sam: Public Education, State Centralization, and Teacher Unionism in France and the United States
by Nicholas Toloudis
Temple University Press, 2012
Paper: 978-1-4399-0907-2 | eISBN: 978-1-4399-0908-9 | Cloth: 978-1-4399-0906-5
Library of Congress Classification LB2844.53.F8T65 2012
Dewey Decimal Classification 331.88113711

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK

Offering the first systematic, comparative examination of the origins of teachers’ unions in two countries—France and the United States—Teaching Marianne and Uncle Sam shows how teachers’ unions came into existence not because of the willful efforts of particular actors, but over the course of decades of conflict over the proper role of professional educators in public politics.

Nicholas Toloudis traces teacher unionism back to the first efforts of governments to centralize public education. He carefully documents how centralization created new understandings of the role of teachers in their societies and generated new sources of conflict within teachers’ corps. Using rare archival source materials, Toloudis illustrates how these internal conflicts became salient in teachers’ battles with governments over their legitimate right to exist as collective claim-makers within the polity.

In the series Politics, History, and Social Change, edited by John C. Torpey

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