cover of book
 

A People's History of Detroit
by Mark Jay and Philip Conklin
Duke University Press, 2020
Paper: 978-1-4780-0834-7 | Cloth: 978-1-4780-0788-3 | eISBN: 978-1-4780-0935-1
Library of Congress Classification HC108.D6J39 2020

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Recent bouts of gentrification and investment in Detroit have led some to call it the greatest turnaround story in American history. Meanwhile, activists point to the city's cuts to public services, water shutoffs, mass foreclosures, and violent police raids. In A People's History of Detroit, Mark Jay and Philip Conklin use a class framework to tell a sweeping story of Detroit from 1913 to the present, embedding Motown's history in a global economic context. Attending to the struggle between corporate elites and radical working-class organizations, Jay and Conklin outline the complex sociopolitical dynamics underlying major events in Detroit's past, from the rise of Fordism and the formation of labor unions, to deindustrialization and the city's recent bankruptcy. They demonstrate that Detroit's history is not a tale of two cities—one of wealth and development and another racked by poverty and racial violence; rather it is the story of a single Detroit that operates according to capitalism's mandates.

See other books on: Community development | Detroit | Detroit (Mich.) | People's History | Urban renewal
See other titles from Duke University Press
Nearby on shelf for Economic history and conditions / By region or country: