cover of book
 

The Undocumented Everyday: Migrant Lives and the Politics of Visibility
by Rebecca M. Schreiber
University of Minnesota Press, 2018
Cloth: 978-1-5179-0022-9 | Paper: 978-1-5179-0023-6
Library of Congress Classification JV6483.S28 2018
Dewey Decimal Classification 325.73

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK

Examining how undocumented migrants are using film, video, and other documentary media to challenge surveillance, detention, and deportation

As debates over immigration increasingly become flashpoints of political contention in the United States, a variety of advocacy groups, social service organizations, filmmakers, and artists have provided undocumented migrants with the tools and training to document their experiences.

In The Undocumented Everyday, Rebecca M. Schreiber examines the significance of self-representation by undocumented Mexican and Central American migrants, arguing that by centering their own subjectivity and presence through their use of documentary media, these migrants are effectively challenging intensified regimes of state surveillance and liberal strategies that emphasize visibility as a form of empowerment and inclusion. Schreiber explores documentation as both an aesthetic practice based on the visual conventions of social realism and a state-administered means of identification and control. 

As Schreiber shows, by visualizing new ways of belonging not necessarily defined by citizenship, these migrants are remaking documentary media, combining formal visual strategies with those of amateur photography and performative elements to create a mixed-genre aesthetic. In doing so, they make political claims and create new forms of protection for migrant communities experiencing increased surveillance, detention, and deportation.

Nearby on shelf for Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration / Emigration and immigration. International migration / United States: