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Objectifying Measures: The Dominance of High-Stakes Testing and the Politics of Schooling
by Amanda Walker Johnson
Temple University Press, 2009
Paper: 978-1-59213-906-4 | eISBN: 978-1-59213-907-1 | Cloth: 978-1-59213-905-7
Library of Congress Classification LB3052.T4J64 2009
Dewey Decimal Classification 371.2609764

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ABOUT THIS BOOK

In the past twenty years, the number of educational tests with high-stakes consequences—such as promotion to the next grade level or graduating from high school—has increased. At the same time, the difficulty of the tests has also increased. In Texas, a Latina state legislator introduced and lobbied for a bill that would take such factors as teacher recommendations, portfolios of student work, and grades into account for the students—usually students of color—who failed such tests. The bill was defeated.


Using several types of ethnographic study (personal interviews, observations of the Legislature in action, news broadcasts, public documents from the Legislature and Texas Education Agency), Amanda Walker Johnson observed the struggle for the bill’s passage. Through recounting this experience, Objectifying Measures explores the relationship between the cultural production of scientific knowledge (of statistics in particular) and the often intuitive resistance to objectification of those adversely affected by the power of policies underwritten as "scientific."


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