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Rivers, Fish, and the People: Tradition, Science, and Historical Ecology of Fisheries in the American West
by Pei-Lin Yu
University of Utah Press, 2015
Paper: 978-1-60781-399-6 | eISBN: 978-1-60781-400-9
Library of Congress Classification SH221.5.N65R58 2015
Dewey Decimal Classification 333.95609795

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY
ABOUT THIS BOOK

America’s western rivers are under assault from development, pollution, invasive species, and climate change. Returning these eco- systems to the time of European contact is often the stated goal for restoration efforts, yet neither the influence of indigenous societ- ies on rivers at the time of contact nor the deeper evolutionary relationships are yet understood by the scientific world. This volume presents a unique synthesis of scientific discoveries and traditional knowledge about the ecology of iconic river species in the American West.

Building from a foundation in fisheries biology and life history data about key species, the book reveals ancient human relationships with those species and describes time-tested Native resource management techniques, drawing from the archaeological record and original ethnographic sources. It evaluates current research trends, summarizes the conceptual foundations for the cultural and evolutionary significance of sustainable use of fish, and seeks pathways for future research. Geographic areas described include the Columbia Plateau, Idaho’s Snake River Plain, the Sacramento River Delta, and the mid-Fraser River of British Columbia. Previously unpublished information is included with the express permission and approval of tribal communities. This approach broadens and deepens the available body of data and establishes a basis for future collaboration between scientists and Native stakeholders toward mutual goals of river ecosystem health. 



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