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The Paleobiological Revolution: Essays on the Growth of Modern Paleontology
edited by David Sepkoski and Michael Ruse
University of Chicago Press, 2009
Cloth: 978-0-226-74861-0 | Paper: 978-0-226-27571-0 | eISBN: 978-0-226-74859-7
Library of Congress Classification QE721.2.E85P347 2009
Dewey Decimal Classification 560

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ABOUT THIS BOOK

The Paleobiological Revolution chronicles the incredible ascendance of the once-maligned science of paleontology to the vanguard of a field. With the establishment of the modern synthesis in the 1940s and the pioneering work of George Gaylord Simpson, Ernst Mayr, and Theodosius Dobzhansky, as well as the subsequent efforts of Stephen Jay Gould, David Raup, and James Valentine, paleontology became embedded in biology and emerged as paleobiology, a first-rate discipline central to evolutionary studies. Pairing contributions from some of the leading actors of the transformation with overviews from historians and philosophers of science, the essays here capture the excitement of the seismic changes in the discipline. In so doing, David Sepkoski and Michael Ruse harness the energy of the past to call for further study of the conceptual development of modern paleobiology.


See other books on: Evolutionary paleobiology | Growth | Paleobiology | Paleontology | Ruse, Michael
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