front cover of Specializing the Courts
Specializing the Courts
Lawrence Baum
University of Chicago Press, 2010

Most Americans think that judges should be, and are, generalists who decide a wide array of cases. Nonetheless, we now have specialized courts in many key policy areas. Specializing the Courts provides the first comprehensive analysis of this growing trend toward specialization in the federal and state court systems.

Lawrence Baum incisively explores the scope, causes, and consequences of judicial specialization in four areas that include most specialized courts: foreign policy and national security, criminal law, economic issues involving the government, and economic issues in the private sector. Baum examines the process by which court systems in the United States have become increasingly specialized and the motives that have led to the growth of specialization. He also considers the effects of judicial specialization on the work of the courts by demonstrating that under certain conditions, specialization can and does have fundamental effects on the policies that courts make. For this reason, the movement toward greater specialization constitutes a major change in the judiciary.

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front cover of The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008
The Supreme Court and the American Elite, 1789-2008
Lucas A. Powe, Jr.
Harvard University Press, 2009
In this engaging - and disturbing - book, a leading historian of the Court reveals the close fit between its decisions and the nation's politics. Drawing on more than four decades of thinking about the Supreme Court and its role in the American political system, this book offers a new, clear, and troubling perspective on American jurisprudence, politics, and history.
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front cover of Supreme Court Appointments
Supreme Court Appointments
Judge Bork and the Politicization of Senate Confirmations
Norman Vieira and Leonard Gross
Southern Illinois University Press, 1998

Norman Vieira and Leonard Gross provide an in-depth analysis of the political and legal framework surrounding the confirmation process for Supreme Court nominees.

President Ronald Reagan’s nomination of Judge Robert Bork to the Supreme Court met with a fierce opposition that was apparent in his confirmation hearings, which were different in many ways from those of any previous nominee. Lasting longer than any other Supreme Court confirmation battle, the Senate hearings dragged on for eighty-seven hours over a twelve-day period. Bork personally testified for more than thirty hours, outlining his legal philosophy in greater detail than had ever before been required of a Supreme Court nominee. Nor had any previous Supreme Court nominee faced the number of witnesses who testified at the Bork hearings.

Deriving their material from hundreds of in-depth interviews with those who participated in the confirmation hearings, Vieira and Gross present a firsthand account of the behind-the-scenes pressure on senators to oppose Bork. Special-interest groups, they note, attempted to control the confirmation process, with both the media and public-opinion polls playing major roles in the defeat of the nomination. Both liberal and conservative groups used the Bork debate to raise money for political war chests.

This behind-the-scenes view of the politics and personalities involved in the Bork confirmation controversy provides a framework for future debates regarding the confirmation process. To help establish that framework, Vieira and Gross examine the similarities as well as the differences between the Bork confirmation battle and other confirmation proceedings for Supreme Court nominees. They also analyze the Supreme Court nominations made after the Bork hearings, including an extensive examination of the controversial Clarence Thomas nomination.

 

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front cover of Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 25
Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 25
Edited by Keith Hylton
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2019
The Supreme Court Economic Review is a faculty-edited, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary law and economics series with a particular focus on economic and social science analysis of judicial decision making, institutional analysis of law and legal structures, political economy and public choice issues regarding courts and other decision-makers, and the relationship between legal and political institutions and the institutions of a free society governed by constitutions and the rule of law. Contributors include renowned legal scholars, economists, and policy-makers, and consistently ranks among the most influential journals of law and economics.
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front cover of Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 26
Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 26
Edited by Murat C. Mungan
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2019
The Supreme Court Economic Review (SCER) is a faculty-edited, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary law and economics series. The journal has a particular focus on economic and social science analysis of judicial decision-making, institutional analysis of law and legal structures, political economy and public choice issues regarding courts and other decision-makers, and the relationship between legal and political institutions and the institutions of a free society governed by constitutions and the rule of law. The series also publishes special symposium issues that build on SCER's traditional focus on the intersection between law and economics. The contributors include renowned legal scholars, economists, and policy-makers, and consistently ranks among the most influential journals of law and economics.
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front cover of Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 27
Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 27
Edited by Murat C. Mungan
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2020
The Supreme Court Economic Review (SCER) is a faculty-edited, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary law and economics series. The journal has a particular focus on economic and social science analysis of judicial decision-making, institutional analysis of law and legal structures, political economy and public choice issues regarding courts and other decision-makers, and the relationship between legal and political institutions and the institutions of a free society governed by constitutions and the rule of law. The series also publishes special symposium issues that build on SCER's traditional focus on the intersection between law and economics. The contributors include renowned legal scholars, economists, and policy-makers, and consistently ranks among the most influential journals of law and economics.
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front cover of Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 28
Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 28
Edited by Murat C. Mungan
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2021
The Supreme Court Economic Review (SCER) is a faculty-edited, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary law and economics series. The journal has a particular focus on economic and social science analysis of judicial decision-making, institutional analysis of law and legal structures, political economy and public choice issues regarding courts and other decision-makers, and the relationship between legal and political institutions and the institutions of a free society governed by constitutions and the rule of law. The series also publishes special symposium issues that build on SCER's traditional focus on the intersection between law and economics. The contributors include renowned legal scholars, economists, and policy-makers, and consistently ranks among the most influential journals of law and economics.
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front cover of Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 6
Supreme Court Economic Review, Volume 6
Edited by Harold Demsetz, Ernest Gellhorn, and Nelson Lund
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1998
This interdisciplinary review series provides an economic analysis of cases decided by the United States Supreme Court, the implicit or explicit economic reasoning employed by the Court, and the economic consequences of the Court's decisions.
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front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1960
The Supreme Court Review, 1960
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1960

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1961
The Supreme Court Review, 1961
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1961

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1962
The Supreme Court Review, 1962
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1962

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1963
The Supreme Court Review, 1963
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1963

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1966
The Supreme Court Review, 1966
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1966

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1967
The Supreme Court Review, 1967
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1967

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1968
The Supreme Court Review, 1968
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1968

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1969
The Supreme Court Review, 1969
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1969

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1971
The Supreme Court Review, 1971
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1971

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1973
The Supreme Court Review, 1973
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1974

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1974
The Supreme Court Review, 1974
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1975

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1975
The Supreme Court Review, 1975
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1976

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1976
The Supreme Court Review, 1976
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1977

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1977
The Supreme Court Review, 1977
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1978

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1979
The Supreme Court Review, 1979
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1980

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1981
The Supreme Court Review, 1981
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1982

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1982
The Supreme Court Review, 1982
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1983

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1983
The Supreme Court Review, 1983
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1984

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1985
The Supreme Court Review, 1985
Edited by Philip B. Kurland
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1986

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1986
The Supreme Court Review, 1986
Edited by Philip B. Kurland, Gerhard Casper, and Dennis J. Hutchinson
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1987

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1987
The Supreme Court Review, 1987
Edited by Philip B. Kurland, Gerhard Casper, and Dennis J. Hutchinson
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1988

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1988
The Supreme Court Review, 1988
Edited by Philip B. Kurland, Gerhard Casper, and Dennis J. Hutchinson
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1989

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1989
The Supreme Court Review, 1989
Edited by Philip B. Kurland, Gerhard Casper, and Dennis J. Hutchinson
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1990

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1994
The Supreme Court Review, 1994
Edited by Dennis J. Hutchinson, David A. Strauss, and Geoffrey R. Stone
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1995
Since it first appeared in 1960, the Supreme Court Review has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court's most significant decisions. Individual essays in the 1994 volume include articles by Craig M. Bradley on RICO and the first amendment; Bernard Schwartz on clear and present danger versus advocacy of unlawful action; William P. Marshall and Susan Gilles on the Supreme Court, the first amendment, and bad journalism; Paul Finkelman on Prigg v. Pennsylvania; Richard H. Fallon, Jr. on sexual harassment, content neutrality, and the first amendment; Lea Brilmayer on federalism, state authority, and the preemptive power of internal law; and C. Edwin Baker on Turner Broadcasting and content-based regulation of persons and presses.
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front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1996
The Supreme Court Review, 1996
Edited by Dennis J. Hutchinson, David A. Strauss, and Geoffrey R. Stone
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1997

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 1997
The Supreme Court Review, 1997
Edited by Dennis J. Hutchinson, David A. Strauss, and Geoffrey R. Stone
University of Chicago Press Journals, 1998

front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 2017
The Supreme Court Review, 2017
Edited by Dennis J. Hutchinson, David A. Strauss, and Geoffrey R. Stone
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2018
Since it first appeared in 1960, The Supreme Court Review (SCR) has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court's most significant decisions. SCR is an in-depth annual critique of the Supreme Court and its work, keeping up on the forefront of the origins, reforms, and interpretations of American law. SCR is written by and for legal academics, judges, political scientists, journalists, historians, economists, policy planners, and sociologists.
 
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front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 2018
The Supreme Court Review, 2018
Edited by David A. Strauss, Geoffrey R. Stone, and Justin Driver
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2019
Since it first appeared in 1960, The Supreme Court Review (SCR) has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court's most significant decisions. SCR is an in-depth annual critique of the Supreme Court and its work, keeping up on the forefront of the origins, reforms, and interpretations of American law. SCR is written by and for legal academics, judges, political scientists, journalists, historians, economists, policy planners, and sociologists.
 
This year’s volume features prominent scholars assessing major legal events, including:
 
Mark Tushnet on President Trump’s “Muslim Ban”
Kate Andrias on Union Fees in the Public Sector
Cass R. Sunstein on Chevron without Chevron
Tracey Maclin on the Fourth Amendment and Unauthorized Drivers
Frederick Schauer on Precedent
Pamela Karlan on Gay Equality and Racial Equality
Randall Kennedy on Palmer v. Thompson
Lisa Marshall Manheim and Elizabeth G. Porter on Voter Suppression
Melissa Murray on Masterpiece Cakeshop
Vikram David Amar on Commandeering
Laura K. Donohue on Carpenter, Precedent, and Originalism
Evan Caminker on Carpenter and Stability 
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front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 2019
The Supreme Court Review, 2019
Edited by David A. Strauss, Geoffrey R. Stone, and Justin Driver
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2020
Since it first appeared in 1960, The Supreme Court Review (SCR) has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court's most significant decisions. SCR is an in-depth annual critique of the Supreme Court and its work, keeping up on the forefront of the origins, reforms, and interpretations of American law. SCR is written by and for legal academics, judges, political scientists, journalists, historians, economists, policy planners, and sociologists.
 
This year’s volume features incisive assessments of major legal events, including:
 
Gillian E. Metzger on The Roberts Court's Administrative Law
Paul Butler on Peremptory Strikes in Mississippi v. Flowers
Nicholas O. Stephanopoulos on Partisan Gerrymandering
Kent Greenfield on Hate Speech
Jennifer M. Chacon on Department of Commerce v. New York
Micah Schwartzman & Nelson Tebbe on Establishment Clause Appeasement
William Baude on Precedent and Originalism
Linda Greenhouse on The Supreme Court’s Challenge to Civil Society
James T. Kloppenberg on James Madison
 
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front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 2020
The Supreme Court Review, 2020
Edited by David A. Strauss, Geoffrey R. Stone, and Justin Driver
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2021

Since it first appeared in 1960, The Supreme Court Review (SCR) has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court's most significant decisions. SCR is an in-depth annual critique of the Supreme Court and its work, keeping up on the forefront of the origins, reforms, and interpretations of American law. SCR is written by and for legal academics, judges, political scientists, journalists, historians, economists, policy planners, and sociologists.

This year’s volume features incisive assessments of major legal events, including:

Cristina M. Rodríguez on the Political Significance of Law
Martha Minow on Little Sisters of the Poor
Cass R. Sunstein and Adrian Vermeule on the Unitary Executive
Cary Franklin on Living Textualism
David A. Strauss on Sexual Orientation and the Dynamics of Discrimination
Saikrishna Bangalore Prakash on the Executive’s Privileges and Immunities
Reva B. Siegel on Abortion Restrictions
Maggie Blackhawk on McGirt v. Oklahoma
Richard J. Lazarus on Advocacy History

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front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 2021
The Supreme Court Review, 2021
Edited by David A. Strauss, Geoffrey R. Stone, Justin Driver, and William Baude
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022
The latest volume in the Supreme Court Review series.

Since it first appeared in 1960, the Supreme Court Review has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court's most significant decisions. SCR is an in-depth annual critique of the Supreme Court and its work, analyzing the origins, reforms, and modern interpretations of American law. SCR is written by and for legal academics, judges, political scientists, journalists, historians, economists, policy planners, and sociologists. 
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front cover of The Supreme Court Review, 2022
The Supreme Court Review, 2022
Edited by David A. Strauss, Geoffrey R. Stone, Justin Driver, and William Baude
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
An annual peer-reviewed law journal covering the legal implications of decisions by the Supreme Court of the United States.

Since it first appeared in 1960, the Supreme Court Review has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court's most significant decisions. SCR is an in-depth annual critique of the Supreme Court and its work, analyzing the origins, reforms, and modern interpretations of American law. SCR is written by and for legal academics, judges, political scientists, journalists, historians, economists, policy planners, and sociologists.
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front cover of Supreme Courts Under Nazi Occupation
Supreme Courts Under Nazi Occupation
Derk Venema
Amsterdam University Press, 2023
This is the first extensive treatment of leading judicial institutions under Nazi rule in WWII. It focusses on all democratic countries under German occupation, and provides the details for answering questions like: how can law serve as an instrument of defence against an oppressive regime? Are the courts always the guardians of democracy and rule of law? What role was there for international law? How did the courts deal with dismissals, new appointees, new courts, forced German ordinances versus national law? How did judges justify their actions, help citizens, appease the enemy, protest against injustice? Experts from all democracies that were occupied by the Nazis paint vivid pictures of oppression, collaboration, and resistance. The results are interpreted in a socio-legal framework introducing the concept of ‘moral hygiene’ to explain the clash between normative and descriptive approaches in public opinion and scholarship concerning officials’ behaviour in war-time.
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