front cover of Appalachian Mushrooms
Appalachian Mushrooms
A Field Guide
Walter E. Sturgeon
Ohio University Press, 2018

From one of the region’s foremost mushroom hunters—Walter E. Sturgeon—comes a long-overdue field guide to finding and identifying the mushrooms and fleshy fungi found in the Appalachian mountains from Canada to Georgia. Edibility and toxicity, habitat, ecology, and detailed diagnostic features of the disparate forms they take throughout their life cycles are all included, enabling the reader to identify species without the use of a microscope or chemicals.

Appalachian Mushrooms is unparalleled in its accuracy and currency, from its detailed photographs to descriptions based on the most advanced classification information available, including recent DNA studies that have upended some mushrooms’ previously accepted taxonomies. Sturgeon celebrates more than 400 species in all their diversity, beauty, and scientific interest, going beyond the expected specimens to include uncommon ones and those that are indigenous to the Appalachian region.

This guide is destined to be an indispensable authority on the subject for everyone from beginning hobbyists to trained experts, throughout Appalachia and beyond.

[more]

front cover of Bark
Bark
A Field Guide to Trees of the Northeast
Michael Wojtech
Brandeis University Press, 2020

What kind of tree is that? Whether you’re hiking in the woods or simply sitting in your backyard, from Maine to New York you’ll never be without an answer to that question, thanks to this handy companion to the trees of the Northeast. Featuring detailed information and illustrations covering each phase of a tree’s lifecycle, this indispensable guidebook explains how to identify trees by their bark alone—no more need to wait for leaf season. Chapters on the structure and ecology of tree bark, descriptions of bark appearance, an easy-to-use identification key, and supplemental information on non-bark characteristics—all enhanced by more than 450 photographs, illustrations, and maps—will show you how to distinguish the textures, shapes, and colors of bark to recognize various tree species, and also understand why these traits evolved. 

Whether you’re a professional naturalist or a parent leading a family hike, this new edition of Bark: A Field Guide to Trees of the Northeast is your essential guide to the region’s 67 native and naturalized tree species.

[more]

front cover of Basic Texas Birds
Basic Texas Birds
A Field Guide
By Mark W. Lockwood
University of Texas Press, 2007

Finding all the birds in Texas can be a lifetime pursuit. Basic Texas Birds, an easy-to-use field guide, will help you identify over 180 species of birds that are found across the state, including a selection of the rarer "Texas specialties" that draw birders to Texas from around the world. These are the birds that form the basis of a birder's life list for Texas.

Basic Texas Birds is organized by bird families to aid in identifying any bird you see in the wild. It is loaded with resources, including:

  • 200 full-color, close-up photos of the birds
  • State-of-the-art range maps—the most accurate of any currently available—that show each species' distribution within the state
  • Up-to-date species accounts that provide a wealth of current and historical information, including each bird's appearance, habitat, status, and distribution, and that also identify similar species
  • A glossary of terms used in bird identification
  • A list of selected readings for learning more about birds found in Texas
  • The Texas Ornithological Society's list of birds documented in Texas

Much more convenient for identifying common birds than a comprehensive state or national field guide, Basic Texas Birds is a must-have resource for both beginning and experienced birders.

[more]

front cover of Birds of Costa Rica
Birds of Costa Rica
A Field Guide
Text and photographs by Carrol L. Henderson
University of Texas Press, 2010

At the biological crossroads of the Americas, Costa Rica hosts an astonishing array of plants and animals—over half a million species! Ecotourists, birders, and biologists come from around the world, drawn by the likelihood of seeing more than three or four hundred species of birds and other animals during even a short stay. To help all of these visitors, as well as local residents, identify and enjoy the wildlife of Costa Rica, Carrol Henderson published Field Guide to the Wildlife of Costa Rica in 2002, and it became the instant and indispensable guide.

Now Henderson has created a dedicated field guide to the birds that travelers are most likely to see, as well as to the unique or endemic species that are of high interest to birders. Birds of Costa Rica covers 310 birds—an increase of 124 species from the earlier volume—with fascinating accounts of the birds' natural history, identification, and behavior gleaned from Henderson's forty years of traveling and birding in Costa Rica. All of the accounts include beautiful photographs of the birds, most of which were taken in the wild by Henderson. There are new updated distribution maps and a detailed appendix that identifies many of the country's best bird-watching locations and lodges, including contact information for trip planning purposes.

[more]

front cover of Butterflies, Moths, and Other Invertebrates of Costa Rica
Butterflies, Moths, and Other Invertebrates of Costa Rica
A Field Guide
By Carrol L. Henderson, with photographs by the author
University of Texas Press, 2010

At the biological crossroads of the Americas, Costa Rica hosts an astonishing array of plants and animals—over half a million species! Ecotourists, birders, and biologists come from around the world, drawn by the likelihood of seeing more than three or four hundred species of birds and other animals during even a short stay. To help all these visitors, as well as local residents, identify and enjoy the wildlife of Costa Rica, Carrol Henderson published Field Guide to the Wildlife of Costa Rica in 2002, and it instantly became the indispensable guide.

Now Henderson has created a dedicated field guide to more than one hundred tropical butterflies, moths, and other invertebrates that travelers are most likely to see while exploring the wild lands of Costa Rica. He includes fascinating information on their natural history, ecology, identification, and behavior gleaned from his forty years of travels and wildlife viewing, as well as details on where to see these remarkable and beautiful creatures. The butterflies, moths, and other invertebrates are illustrated by over 180 stunning and colorful photographs—most of which were taken in the wild by Henderson. A detailed and invaluable appendix that identifies many of Costa Rica's best wildlife-watching destinations, lodges, and contact information for trip-planning purposes completes the volume.

[more]

front cover of Butterflies of Illinois
Butterflies of Illinois
A Field Guide
Michael R. Jeffords, Susan L. Post, and James R. Wiker
University of Illinois Press, 2019
Prairie spaces and abundant wildflowers make Illinois an amateur lepidopterist's delight. Butterflies of Illinois offers a portable, easy-to-use guide rich with descriptions, field photography, and life-sized specimen photos of all the state's native species. It also includes:• identification quick guides depicting the tops and undersides of all butterfly species• scientific information and photos that explain life cycles, habitats, and ecology• range maps• flight period charts• key characteristics relevant to field identification• descriptions of rarely seen butterflies and irregular visitors from nearby states• supplemental information on various species, including collection records and unusual sightings Geared toward enthusiasts and experts alike, Butterflies of Illinois is a must-have companion for any nature hike or garden walk.
[more]

front cover of Canoe Country Wildlife
Canoe Country Wildlife
A Field Guide to the North Woods and Boundary Waters
Mark Stensaas
University of Minnesota Press, 2004

Warblers, wolves, and whirligig beetles—the creatures of the canoe countrywilderness come alive in Canoe Country Wildlife. In this read-aloud treasure, “Sparky” Stensaas, naturalist and storyteller, intrigues you with his tales of encounters with the forest inhabitants—from tiny toads to majestic moose.

Canoe Country Wildlife, a friendly field guide, introduces you to the wildlife you are most likely to see as you travel in the North Woods. It describes these creatures and their habits accurately so you’ll know where and when to look for them. Detailed line drawings illustrate each animal clearly so you’ll recognize what you’re seeing.

The book is filled with fascinating little-known facts: Did you know that wood frogs can freeze solid, only to live again? That loons can fly a hundred miles an hour? That chipmunks can carry seventy sunflower seeds in their cheeks?

Canoe Country Wildlife includes handy checklists to help you keep track of the critters you encounter, a calendar for you to record the natural events you witness, and activities—one for each animal—that will help both adults and children learn by discovery.

Carry Canoe Country Wildlife in your pack. Your trip will be more enjoyable and your memories will last forever. It’s a great gift for anyone who loves the outdoors.

[more]

front cover of Cemeteries of Illinois
Cemeteries of Illinois
A Field Guide to Markers, Monuments, and Motifs
Hal Hassen
University of Illinois Press, 2017
Illinois is home to cemeteries and burial grounds dating back to the Native American era. Whether sprawling over thousands of acres or dotting remote woodlands, these treasure troves of local and state history reflect two centuries of social, economic, and technological change. This easy-to-use guidebook invites amateur genealogists, historians, and cemetery buffs to decipher the symbols and uncover the fascinating past awaiting them in Illinois 's resting places. Hal Hassen and Dawn Cobb have combined almost three hundred photographs with expert detail to showcase how cemeteries and burial grounds can teach us about archaeology, folklore, art, geology, and social behavior. Features include
  • the ways different materials used as gravestones and markers reflect historical trends;
  • how to understanding the changes in the use of iconographic images;
  • the story behind architectural features like fencing, roads, and gates;
  • what enthusiasts can do to preserve local cemeteries for future generations.
Captivating and informed, Cemeteries of Illinois is the only guide you need to unlock the mysteries of our state 's final resting places.
[more]

front cover of Colorado Flora
Colorado Flora
Eastern Slope, Fourth Edition
A Field Guide to the Vascular Plants
William A. Weber
University Press of Colorado, 2011
Colorado Flora: Eastern Slope describes the remarkable flora of the state, distinctive in its altitudinal range, numerous microhabitats, and ancient and rare plants. Together with Colorado Flora: Western Slope, Fourth Edition, these volumes are designed to educate local amateurs and professionals in the recognition of vascular plant species and encourage informed stewardship of our biological heritage.

These thoroughly revised and updated editions reflect current taxonomic knowledge. The authors describe botanical features of this unparalleled biohistorical region and its mountain ranges, basins, and plains and discuss plant geography, giving detailed notes on habitat, ecology, and range. The keys recount interesting anecdotes and introductions for each plant family. The book is rounded out with historical background of botanical work in the state, suggested readings, glossary, index to scientific and common names, references, and hundreds of illustrations. The books also contain a new contribution from Donald R. Farrar and Steve J. Popovich on moonworts. The fourth editions of Colorado Flora: Eastern Slope and Colorado Flora: Western Slope are ideal for both student and scientist and essential for readers interested in Colorado's plant life.

[more]

front cover of Colorado Flora
Colorado Flora
Western Slope, Fourth Edition
A Field Guide to the Vascular Plants
William A. Weber
University Press of Colorado, 2011
Colorado Flora: Western Slope describes the remarkable flora of the state, distinctive in its altitudinal range, numerous microhabitats, and ancient and rare plants. Together with Colorado Flora: Eastern Slope, Fourth Edition, these volumes are designed to educate local amateurs and professionals in the recognition of vascular plant species and encourage informed stewardship of our biological heritage.

These thoroughly revised and updated editions reflect current taxonomic knowledge. The authors describe botanical features of this unparalleled biohistorical region and its mountain ranges, basins, and plains and discuss plant geography, giving detailed notes on habitat, ecology, and range. The keys contain interesting anecdotes and introductions for each plant family. The book is rounded out with historical background of botanical work in the state, suggested readings, glossary, index to scientific and common names, references, and hundreds of illustrations. The books also contain a new contribution from Donald R. Farrar and Steve J. Popovich on moonworts. The fourth editions of Colorado Flora: Eastern Slope and Colorado Flora: Western Slope are ideal for both student and scientist and essential for readers interested in Colorado's plant life.

[more]

front cover of Common Insects of Texas and Surrounding States
Common Insects of Texas and Surrounding States
A Field Guide
By John Abbott and Kendra Abbott
University of Texas Press, 2020

Thanks to its size and geographic position, Texas is home to nearly 30,000 species of insects, likely making its insect population the most diverse in the nation. Ranging from eastern and western to temperate and tropical species, this vast array of insects can be difficult to identify. In Common Insects of Texas and Surrounding States, John and Kendra Abbott have created the state's most comprehensive field guide to help readers recognize and understand these fascinating creatures.

Containing 1,300 species and more than 2,700 photographs, this guide offers a wealth of information about the characteristics and behaviors of Texas's insects. Each chapter introduces an order with a discussion of general natural history and a description of other qualities helpful in distinguishing its various species, while every species' entry provides a state map showing where it is most likely to be found, a key displaying its seasonal distribution, information about its habitat, and corresponding photos. Featuring colored tabs for quick reference, a glossary, and information about other arthropods, this guide is the perfect companion for anyone wanting to identify and learn more about the many insects of Texas.

[more]

front cover of Common Woody Plants and Cacti of South Texas
Common Woody Plants and Cacti of South Texas
A Field Guide
By Richard B. Taylor with Texas Parks & Wildlife Department
University of Texas Press, 2014

Woody plants and cacti are vital staple foods for cattle, deer, and other wildlife in drought-prone South Texas. Ranchers, hunters, and land managers who need to identify these plants relied on A Field Guide to Common South Texas Shrubs (published by Texas Parks & Wildlife Press and distributed by UT Press), which is no longer in print. Responding to ongoing demand for the book, Richard B. Taylor has completely updated and expanded it with seven new species, new photographs, and a quick plant identification key.

Common Woody Plants and Cacti of South Texas is an easy-to-use plant identification field guide to fifty species that comprise an estimated 90 percent of the region’s woody canopy cover north of the Rio Grande Valley. The species accounts include photographs, descriptions, values to livestock and wildlife, and nutritional information. The book also provides historical perspectives and information on brush management techniques and strategies, as well as habitat appraisal. All of these resources will enable readers to analyze stocking rates for deer and cattle, evaluate a prospective hunting lease, or buy property.

[more]

front cover of Damselflies of Texas
Damselflies of Texas
A Field Guide
By John C. Abbott
University of Texas Press, 2011

On any warm summer day, you can easily observe damselflies around a vegetated pond or the rocks along the banks of a stream. Like the more familiar dragonfly, damselflies are among the most remarkably distinctive insects in their appearance and biology, and they have become one of the most popular creatures sought by avocational naturalists.

Damselflies of Texas is the first field guide dedicated specifically to the species found in Texas. It covers 77 of the 138 species of damselflies known in North America, making it a very useful guide for the entire United States. Each species account includes:

  • illustrations of as many forms (male, female, juvenile, mature, and color morphs) as possible
  • common and scientific names, with pronunciation
  • distribution map
  • key features
  • identifying characteristics
  • discussion of similar species
  • status in Texas
  • habitat, seasonality, and general comments

In addition to photographing damselflies in the wild, the author and illustrator have developed a new process for illustrating each species by scanning preserved specimens and digitally painting them. The resulting illustrations show detail that is not visible in photographs. The book also contains chapters on damselfly anatomy, life history, conservation, names, and photography, as well as a list of species that may eventually be discovered in Texas, state and global conservation rankings, seasonality of all species in chronological order, and additional resources and publications on the identification of damselflies.

[more]

front cover of Dragonflies of Texas
Dragonflies of Texas
A Field Guide
By John C. Abbott
University of Texas Press, 2015

Dragonflies and damselflies (together known as Odonata) are among the most remarkably distinctive insects in their appearance and biology, and they have become some of the most popular creatures sought by avocational naturalists. Texas hosts 160 species of dragonflies, nearly half of the 327 species known in North America, making the state a particularly good place to observe dragonflies in their natural habitats.

Dragonflies of Texas is the definitive field guide to these insects. It covers all 160 species with in situ photographs and detailed anatomical images as needed. Each species is given a two-page spread that includes photographs of both sexes and known variations when possible, key features, a distribution map, identification, discussion of similar species, status in Texas, habitat, seasonality, and general comments. Many of the groups also have comparative plates that show anatomically distinctive characteristics. In addition to the species accounts, John Abbott discusses dragonfly anatomy, life history, conservation, names, and photography. He also provides information on species that may eventually be discovered in Texas, state and global conservation rankings, seasonality of all species in chronological order, and additional resources and publications on the identification of dragonflies.

[more]

front cover of Exploring Nature in Illinois
Exploring Nature in Illinois
A Field Guide to the Prairie State
Michael Jeffords and Susan Post
University of Illinois Press, 2014
Loaded with full color photographs and evocative descriptions, Exploring Nature in Illinois provides a panorama of the state's overlooked natural diversity. Naturalists Michael Jeffords and Susan Post explore fifty preserves, forests, restoration areas, and parks, bringing an expert view to wildlife and landscapes and looking beyond the obvious to uncover the unexpected beauty of Illinois's wild places.
 
From the colorful variety of birds at War Bluff Valley Audubon Sanctuary to the exposed bedrock and cliff faces of Apple River Canyon, Exploring Nature in Illinois will inspire readers to explore wonders hidden from urban sprawl and cultivated farmland. Maps and descriptions help travelers access even hard-to-find sites while a wealth of detail and photography offers nature-lovers insights into the flora, fauna, and other aspects of vibrant settings and ecosystems. The authors also include diary entries describing their own impressions of and engagement with the sites.
 
A unique and much-needed reference, Exploring Nature in Illinois will entertain and enlighten hikers, cyclers, students and scouts, morning walkers, weekend drivers, and anyone else seeking to get back to nature in the Prairie State.
[more]

front cover of A Field Guide to a New Meta-field
A Field Guide to a New Meta-field
Bridging the Humanities-Neurosciences Divide
Edited by Barbara Maria Stafford
University of Chicago Press, 2011

Barbara Stafford is a pioneering art historian whose research has long helped to bridge the divide between the humanities and cognitive sciences. In A Field Guide to a New Meta-Field, she marshals a distinguished group of thinkers to forge a ground-breaking dialogue between the emerging brain sciences, the liberal arts, and social sciences.

Stafford’s book examines meaning and mental function from this dual experimental perspective. The wide-ranging essays included here—from Frank Echenhofer’s foray into shamanist hallucinogenic visions to David Bashwiner’s analysis of emotion and danceability—develop a common language for implementing programmatic and institutional change. Demonstrating how formerly divided fields are converging around shared issues, A Field Guide to a New Meta-Field maps a high-level, crossdisciplinary adventure from one of our leading figures in visual studies.

[more]

front cover of Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Illinois
Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Illinois
Christopher A. Phillips, John A. Crawford, and Andrew R. Kuhns. Foreword by Ronald A. Brandon
University of Illinois Press, 2022
The second edition of the Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Illinois offers up-to-date information on the state’s 102 species of frogs and toads, salamanders, turtles, lizards, and snakes. Detailed descriptions by the authors include habitats, distinguishing features, behaviors, and other facts, while revised range maps and full-color photographs help users recognize animals in the field. In addition, an identification key and easy-to-navigate page layouts guide readers through extensive background material on each species' population, diet, predators, reproduction, and conservation status.

A one-of-a-kind resource, the Field Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles of Illinois is a definitive guide aimed at biologists, teachers, students, wildlife specialists, natural resource managers, conservationists, law enforcement officials, landowners, hobbyists, and everyone else eager to explore herpetology and nature in the Prairie State.

[more]

front cover of A Field Guide to Conservation Finance
A Field Guide to Conservation Finance
Story Clark
Island Press, 2007
Finally, a comprehensive book on land conservation financing for community and regional conservation leaders. A Field Guide to Conservation Finance provides essential advice on how to tackle the universal obstacle to protecting private land in America: lack of money.
 
Story Clark dispels the myths that conservationists can access only private funds controlled by individuals or that only large conservation organizations have clout with big capital markets. She shows how small land conservation organizations can achieve conservation goals using both traditional and cutting-edge financial strategies. Clark outlines essential tools for raising money, borrowing money, and reducing the cost of transactions. She covers a range of subjects including transfer fees, voluntary surcharges, seller financing, revolving funds, and Project Related Investment programs (PRIs). A clear, well-written overview of the basics of conservation finance with useful insights and real stories combine to create a book that is an invaluable and accessible guide for land trusts seeking to protect more land.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to New England Barns and Farm Buildings
Field Guide to New England Barns and Farm Buildings
Thomas Durant Visser
University Press of New England, 1997
The quintessential New England barn–photogenic, full of character, and framed by flaming autumn foliage–is an endangered species. Of some 30,000 barns in Vermont alone, nearly a thousand a year are lost to fire, collapse, or bulldozers. Thomas Durant Visser’s field guide to the barns, silos, sugar houses, granaries, tobacco barns, and potato houses of New England is an attempt to document not just their structure but their traditions and innovations before the surviving architectural evidence of this rich rural heritage is lost forever. A recognized authority on historic barn preservation, Visser has combed the six-state region for representative barns and outbuildings, and 200 of his photographs are reproduced here. The text, which includes accounts from 18th– and 19th–century observers, describes key architectural characteristics, historic uses, and geographic distribution as well as specific features like timbers and frames, sheathings, doors, and cupolas. From English barns to bank barns, from ice houses to outhouses, these irreplaceable assets, Visser writes, “linger as vulnerable survivors of the past. Yet before these buildings vanish, each has a story to tell.” Travelers, residents, and scholars alike will find Visser’s text invaluable in uncovering, understanding, and appreciating the stories inherent in these dwindling cultural artifacts.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to Oregon Rivers
Field Guide to Oregon Rivers
Tim Palmer
Oregon State University Press, 2024
In this updated edition of his classic Field Guide to Oregon Rivers, Tim Palmer gives us an unprecedented reference, introducing the state’s waterways and offering outdoor enthusiasts and resource professionals an interpretive approach to an extraordinary network of streams. He begins with natural history—geology, climate, hydrology, plants, and wildlife—then profiles 111 Oregon rivers with notes about nature, fish, and conservation, followed by essential tips on where to see each river, hike along the shores, fish, and explore by canoe, kayak, and raft. Illustrations identify riparian plants and animals while more than 150 photographs showcase a magnificent rivers estate. This volume is an essential outdoor companion for Oregonians and visitors alike.
[more]

front cover of A Field Guide to Snow
A Field Guide to Snow
Matthew Sturm
University of Alaska Press, 2020
People love snow. They love to ski and sled on it, snowshoe through it, and watch it fall from the sky. They love the way it blankets a landscape, making it look tranquil and beautiful. Few people, however, know how snow works. What makes it possible for us to slip and slide over, whether that’s falling on sidewalks or skiing down a mountain? What makes it cling to branches and street signs? What qualities of snow lead to avalanches?

In A Field Guide to Snow, veteran snow scientist Matthew Sturm answers those questions and more. Drawing on decades of study, he explains in clear and simple ways how and why snow works the way it does. The perfect companion a ski trip or a hike in the snowy woods, A Field Guide to Snow will give you a new appreciation for the science behind snow’s beauty.
 
[more]

front cover of A Field Guide to the Familiar
A Field Guide to the Familiar
Learning to Observe the Natural World
Gale Lawrence
Brandeis University Press, 1998
Designed both to encourage beginning naturalists and to challenge more experienced observers to look at the familiar in new ways, A Field Guide to the Familiar offers an introduction to common plants, animals, and natural phenomena. Beautiful drawings add to the book's refreshing approach to nature study. Organized by the seasons of the year, each chapter focuses on one subject and one learning objective. From fall’s first frost to the field crickets of high summer, this innovative guide explores in depth such familiar sights as bumblebees, rainbows, acorns, blueberries, and shooting stars. Each chapter includes descriptive information to help readers identify each subject, as well as life cycle information that shows how a subject functions within a grander scheme. Readers learn that every plant and animal – even the atmosphere – has its own story, and they begin to perceive the natural world as whole, interconnected, and continuous. Whether read sequentially or used as a field companion or handy desk reference, A Field Guide to the Familiar gives every reader a sense of the natural world as an accessible – and endlessly fascinating – place.
[more]

front cover of A Field Guide to the Families and Genera of Woody Plants of Northwest South America
A Field Guide to the Families and Genera of Woody Plants of Northwest South America
With Supplementary Notes on Herbaceous Taxa
Alwyn H. Gentry
University of Chicago Press, 1993
To understand almost any part of the tropical rain forest's fabulously complex web of life, one must first learn to identify a bewildering array of plants. Alwyn Gentry's landmark book, completed just before his tragic death in 1993, is the only field guide to the nearly 250 families of woody plants in the most species-rich region of South America.

As a consummate field researcher, Gentry designed this guide to be not just comprehensive, but also easy to use in rigorous field conditions. Unlike many field guides, which rely for their identifications on flowers and fruits that are only present during certain seasons, Gentry's book focuses on characters such as bark, leaves, and odor that are present year-round. His guide is filled with clear illustrations, step-by-step keys to identification, and a wealth of previously unpublished data.

All biologists, wildlife managers, conservationists, and government officials concerned with the tropical rain forests will need and use this field guide.

Alwyn Gentry was one of the world's foremost experts on the biology of tropical plants. He was senior curator at the Missouri Botanical Garden, and was a member of Conservation International's interdisciplinary Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) team, which inventories the biodiversity of the most threatened tropical areas. From 1967 to 1993 he collected more than 80,000 plant specimens, many of them new to science.
[more]

front cover of A Field Guide to the Heavens
A Field Guide to the Heavens
Frank X. Gaspar
University of Wisconsin Press, 1999

Frank X. Gaspar’s collection of poems is haunted by the presence of mystics and visionaries: Mohammed, Buddha, St. Paul, Augustine, George Herbert, Emily Dickinson, Blake, Milton, Rilke. A Field Guide to the Heavens is punctuated with designs of science, the wondering and rapt observations of the sky made at the eyepiece of a backyard telescope. We come to know Gaspar’s city streets, the neighbors and strangers that walk them, the wreckage of past lives, the ocean, the gardens, the orchards and alleys and parking lots, all spread out under the vast sky.

[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Introduced Flora of South Georgia
Field Guide to the Introduced Flora of South Georgia
Rebecca Upson, Bradley Myer, Kelvin Floyd, Jennifer Lee, and Colin Clubbe
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2017
In the late eighteenth century, the first sealing ships from England arrived in South Georgia. With them came a host of invasive plants, which set to work upending the island ecosystem. Today, forty-one non-native plant species are established in the region and, even a century later, they continue to threaten the native species and habitats of South Georgia.
This is the first field guide to comprehensively cover these species, providing full-color photographs, distribution maps, and species descriptions, plus keys to the grasses and sedges of the area. This guide is accessible even to non-botanists and also provides an opportunity for visitors to be part of a citizen science program contributing sightings and improving our knowledge of the introduced flora of South Georgia.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Lichens of Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Field Guide to the Lichens of Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Erin Tripp
University of Tennessee Press, 2020

With 909 recognized species of lichens, Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) is home to more of these lichenized fungi than any other national park in the United States, as well as nearly half of all species known to occur in eastern North America. There is a great deal of room for scientific exploration, inquiry, and systematic description in the realm of lichenology. In Field Guide to the Lichens of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Erin Tripp and James Lendemer take on the formidable task of creating an all-in-one resource for Park exploration, including lichen distribution maps, tools for identification, vivid photographs and illustrations, and even field notes from their own research campaigns. In the process, the authors create a touchstone for lichen taxonomy and ecology, and they inspire others—researchers as well as casual observers—to take interest in the incredible biodiversity of the Great Smoky Mountains. Biologists, botanists, visitors to the park, naturalists, and others interested in the flora and fauna of both the southern Appalachians and GSMNP will thoroughly enjoy this lovingly prepared field guide.

[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Lichens of White Rocks
Field Guide to the Lichens of White Rocks
(Boulder, Colorado)
Erin Tripp
University Press of Colorado, 2017
Field Guide to the Lichens of White Rocks is a careful examination of the lichens that occur at the ecologically important and lichenologically rich urban outcropping of Fox Hills sandstone known as White Rocks Nature Preserve, located in Boulder County, Colorado.
 
This extensively illustrated field guide presents detailed information on the macroscopic and microscopic features needed to identify species, as well as extensive notes on how to differentiate closely related lichens—both those present at White Rocks and those likely to be found elsewhere in western North America. This guide is one of the only complete lichen inventories of a sandstone formation in North America and covers all constituents including the crustose microlichen biota, traditionally excluded from other inventories. A short introduction and glossary equip the reader with basic information on lichen morphology, reproduction, and ecology.
 
Visitors to White Rocks Nature Preserve must schedule staff-led public tours or set up sponsored research projects through the City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks, and there are many other outcroppings of Fox Hills sandstone across the West, making Field Guide to the Lichens of White Rocks a significant resource for anyone interested in this unique environment. This accessible, user-friendly guide will also be valuable to naturalists and lichenologists around the world as well as educators, conservationists, and land managers concerned with the growing significance of open spaces and other protected urban areas throughout North America.
 
 
The University Press of Colorado gratefully acknowledges the generous support of the University of Colorado Natural History Museum, City of Boulder Parks & Open Spaces, and the Colorado Native Plant Society board and members toward the publication of this book.
 
[more]

front cover of A Field Guide to the Natural Communities of Michigan
A Field Guide to the Natural Communities of Michigan
Joshua G. Cohen
Michigan State University Press, 2014
The culmination of three decades of work by Michigan Natural Features Inventory ecologists, this essential guidebook to the natural communities of Michigan introduces the diverse terrain of a unique state. Small enough to carry in a backpack, this field guide provides a system for dividing the complex natural landscape of Michigan into easily understood and describable components called natural communities. Providing a new way to explore Michigan’s many environments, this book details natural communities ranging from patterned fen to volcanic bedrock glade and beyond. The descriptions are supplemented with distribution maps, vibrant photographs, and comprehensive lists of characteristic plant species. The authors suggest places to visit to further study each type of natural community and provide a comprehensive glossary of ecological terms, as well as a dichotomous key for aiding field identification. An invaluable resource, this book is meant to serve as a tool for those seeking to understand, describe, document, conserve, and restore the diversity of natural communities native to Michigan.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Orchids of Europe and the Mediterranean
Field Guide to the Orchids of Europe and the Mediterranean
Rolf Kühn, Henrik Ærenlund Pedersen, and Phillip Cribb
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2024
An updated, comprehensive guide to the orchids of Europe and the Mediterranean region.

Field Guide to the Orchids of Europe and the Mediterranean: Second Edition is a comprehensive photographic guide to the orchids of the region written by leading experts, who between them have decades of orchid field and research experience. The book covers orchids from Europe and the Mediterranean, extending to Turkey and the immediate near east of North Africa and Macaronesia.

Many guides to orchids of this region exist, but in this completely revised second edition, the authors have drawn on the latest scientific research to bring clarity to orchid identification and names, with an emphasis on the natural variability that exists in many wild species. This edition incorporates the latest updates in taxonomy. With over 2000 color photographs and new images, the book provides the reader with an accessible and easy-to-use identification guide to the natural variability seen in these orchids.

The book covers thirty genera and their species including Ophrys, Cypripedium, Orchis, Dactylorhiza, Epipactis, and Serapias, as well as seventy natural hybrids. Much of the confusion over identification is due to the morphological variation a species can have within a habitat and across its distribution, and therefore to simplify identification, several images accompany each species to illustrate this diversity, along with notes on distinguishing features and distribution maps. Each species is also accompanied by common names and important synonyms, as well as notes on habitat, flowering times, and distinguishing features.
 
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Orchids of Europe and the Mediterranean
Field Guide to the Orchids of Europe and the Mediterranean
Rolf Kuehn, Henrik Pedersen, and Phillip Cribb
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2018
Field Guide to the Orchids of Europe and the Mediterranean is a comprehensive manual that pairs thousands of color photographs with expert guidance, making it easy for readers to identify the varied orchid species of this region. The authors bring decades of field and research experience to this project and combine their first-hand knowledge with the latest scientific research, making this the most thorough and up-to-date book available.

The book covers orchids from Europe and the Mediterranean, as well as areas in Turkey and the immediate near east of North Africa and Macaronesia. It includes thirty genera and their species including Ophrys, Cypripedium, Orchis, Dactylorhiza, Epipactis, and Serapias, as well as seventy natural hybrids. The authors emphasize the natural variability that exists in many wild species and work to eliminate the confusion that can arise due to the morphological variation. Each species includes multiple images to illustrate this diversity as well as notes on distinguishing features and distribution maps. Common names and important synonyms accompany each species alongside notes on habitat, flowering times, and distinguishing features.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Orchids of Madagascar
Field Guide to the Orchids of Madagascar
Phillip Cribb and Johan Hermans
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2009

As is the case with many other rare and sought-after species of plant and animal, Madagascar is one of the world’s prime locations for orchids, which make up the largest family of flowering plants on the island. Madagascar is home to nearly one thousand different species of orchids—which make up nearly ten percent of the island’s flora—nearly nine hundred of them endemic. Orchids are found in almost every habitat on the island, from the mountains to the coasts, and this field guide—the first of its kind, fully illustrated with color photographs and packed with details to aid identification—is an invaluable tool for researchers and ecotourists visiting the island.

[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Plants of the Falkland Islands
Field Guide to the Plants of the Falkland Islands
Thomas Heller, Rebecca Upson, and Richard Lewis
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2018
Field Guide to the Plants of the Falkland Islands is the output from a collaboration between scientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Falklands Conservation, who have been working together for many years. With recent additions to the flora, there are now 181 vascular plant species recorded as native to the Islands, including one natural hybrid, as well as 14 vascular plant species that are endemic to the Falklands and therefore found nowhere else. This new comprehensive field guide covers over 300 species, including both native and non-native, from 14 broad habitat types.
[more]

front cover of A Field Guide to the Poetry of Theodore Roethke
A Field Guide to the Poetry of Theodore Roethke
William Barillas
Ohio University Press, 2021
A constellation of essays that reanimates the work of this pivotal twentieth-century American poet for a new century. This volume is the first to reconsider Roethke’s work in terms of the expanded critical approaches to literature that have emerged since his death in 1963. Editor William Barillas and over forty contributors, including highly respected literary scholars, critics, and writers such as Peter Balakian, Camille Paglia, Jay Parini, and David Wojahn, collectively make a case for Roethke’s poetry as a complete, unified, and evolving body of work. The accessible essays employ a number of approaches, including formalism, ecocriticism, reader-response, and feminist critique to explicate the poetics, themes, and the biographical, historical, cultural, and literary contexts of Roethke’s work.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Sedges of the Pacific Northwest
Field Guide to the Sedges of the Pacific Northwest
Second Edition
Barbara J. Wilson, Richard Brainerd, Danny Lytjen, Bruce Newhouse, and Nick Otting of the Carex Working Group
Oregon State University Press, 2014
Field Guide to the Sedges of the Pacific Northwest is an illustrated guide to all 169 species, subspecies, and varieties in the genus Carex that grow in the wild in Oregon and Washington. Most of these species are found throughout the Pacific Northwest and California. This updated second edition includes eight additional species documented in the region since the guide was first published, along with an improved identification key, updated nomenclature and taxonomy, revised range maps, and improved illustrations.

Sedges can be difficult to identify, with differences between species based on small, technical characters. This comprehensive guide contains identification keys, descriptions, more than 650 color photographs, and distribution maps for each species, providing users with helpful tools and tips for identifying the plants in this challenging group. Information about sedge ecology, habitat, management and restoration, ethnobotanical uses, and propagation enhances the guide’s utility.

Field Guide to the Sedges of the Pacific Northwest provides an invaluable resource for botanists, land managers, restoration ecologists, and plant enthusiasts. And, as the genus Carex becomes increasingly important amongst landscapers, nurseries, and gardeners, the guide will serve as a handy tool for choosing Northwest natives for the garden.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Algarve
Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Algarve
Chris Thorogood and Simon Hiscock
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2014
The Algarve region is one of the most popular holiday destinations in Europe—more than seven million tourists enjoy the beaches and culture of southern Portugal each year. While its mild climate entices human visitors, it also encourages natives of the floral variety. Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Algarve is the first comprehensive guide to these flowers. It covers more than one thousand of the species found in the area, which includes the remarkable Cape St. Vincent Peninsula National Park.

With the Field Guide, visitors can find the best places and times to see the plants. The Guide also explains their habitats and vegetation types. Richly illustrated, it includes hundreds of color photos and line drawings to aid identification, plus distribution maps that make it easy to plan trips and find nearby species.

Introductory passages give environmental context and cover climate, geology, agriculture, wildflower classification, and flower morphology. Written to appeal to both amateur naturalists and professional botanists alike, this is the essential companion for anyone drawn to the rich beauty of the Algarve.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Algarve
Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Algarve
Second Edition
Chris Thorogood and Simon Hiscock
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2019
The Algarve region of southern Portugal is an area of immense botanical importance with numerous endemic and rare species. It is also one of the most popular holiday destinations in Europe, where it sees more than seven million tourists per year. Scientists and sightseers alike are drawn to the lovely flowers that dot the landscape. This is one of the few comprehensive identification guides that caters to both kinds of visitors, and the first edition has been a best-seller.

This second edition is fully updated with new species and new findings. Information is provided on where and when to see plants with information on their habitat and vegetation types. Rare and unusual plants of the region are highlighted, including orchids and parasitic plants. The more than one thousand descriptions are accompanied throughout with over 650 stunning color photographs, 780 line drawings, and distribution maps.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Eastern Mediterranean
Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Eastern Mediterranean
Chris Thorogood
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2019
Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the EasternMediterranean is the most comprehensive and up-to-date plant identification guide to the area. This large area has a complex and varied geology and topography but is united by its typically Mediterranean climate of hot, dry summers and mild, wet winters. The eastern Mediterranean has an exceptionally high number of endemic species, and a flora quite distinct from the western Mediterranean Basin.

The geographic coverage of this book spans the Ionian Archipelago, mainland Greece, Peloponnese, Aegean Islands, Crete, Cyprus, Mediterranean Turkey, and the coasts of Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, and Syria. Featuring more than three thousand plants, this easy-to-use guide focuses on the most common and conspicuous species that occur in the area, with plant descriptions, color photographs, and illustrations throughout. A section on where to see wild flowers in the region is included, as well as a glossary of terms. An ideal companion for wildlife and plant enthusiasts, this guide will enable anyone to reliably identify wild flowers in the field.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Western Mediterranean, Second Edition
Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Western Mediterranean, Second Edition
Chris Thorogood
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2021
A thorough field guide to the wildflowers of the western Mediterranean’s sunny shores.
 
The western Mediterranean—running from Italy to Portugal and encompassing Corsica, Sardinia, the Balearic Islands, and coastal North Africa—is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world, home to more than 10,000 plant species. This updated edition of the Field Guide to the Wild Flowers of the Western Mediterranean is the most comprehensive plant identification guide to the area. Covering more than 2,500 plants, this accessible guide focuses on the most common and conspicuous species that occur in the area, with descriptions, color photographs, and illustrations throughout. The book also includes sections on where to find native plants in the wild, as well as a glossary of terms. An ideal companion for wildlife and plant enthusiasts, this guide will enable even the most botanically blind to reliably identify native flora in the sunny and coastal climes of the western Mediterranean.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Wild Plants of Oman
Field Guide to the Wild Plants of Oman
Helen Pickering and Annette Patzelt
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2008

This compact volume is a handy, thorough guide to the wild plants found in the small Middle Eastern nation of Oman. A short introduction provides an overview of Oman’s geography and remarkable environmental diversity, followed by catalog of more than 250 common species of plants, enhanced by color photographs designed to assist with quick identification in the field. Descriptive accounts—including details of habitat, uses, and worldwide distribution—round out the individual entries, while a glossary of botanical terms, a bibliography, and an index of scientific and vernacular names combine to make this an invaluable reference.

[more]

front cover of Field Guide to the Wildflowers of the Western Mediterranean
Field Guide to the Wildflowers of the Western Mediterranean
Chris Thorogood
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 2016
The Western Mediterranean is home to more than 10,000 plant species, which makes it one of the most important regions in the world for biodiversity. This book is the most comprehensive and up-to-date guide to Western Mediterranean wildflowers, covering southern Europe from the Portuguese Algarve to Italy, and Morocco to Tunisia in North Africa, along with all the islands in between. It features 2,500 plants, and its more than 800 line drawings and color photographs make it the ideal companion for field identification.
 
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to Tidal Wetland Plants of the Northeastern United States and Neighboring Canada
Field Guide to Tidal Wetland Plants of the Northeastern United States and Neighboring Canada
Vegetation of Beaches, Tidal Flats, Rocky Shores, Marshes, Swamps, and Coastal Ponds
Ralph W. Tiner
University of Massachusetts Press, 2009
First published in 1987, Ralph W. Tiner's A Field Guide to Coastal Wetland Plants of the Northeastern United States soon established itself as the definitive work on its subject. Now Tiner has prepared a revised and expanded edition, broadening the coverage both botanically and geographically. It emphasizes plant identification and includes descriptions of over 700 species and illustrations of approximately 550 species. More tidal wetland types are covered (beaches, rocky shores, and tidal swamps) and the geographic scope extends as far north as Canada's Maritime Provinces.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to Wildflowers of Nebraska and the Great Plains
Field Guide to Wildflowers of Nebraska and the Great Plains
Second Edition
Jon Farrar
University of Iowa Press, 2012
From the mixed-grass prairies of the Panhandle in the west, to the Sandhills prairie and mixed-grass prairies in central Nebraska, to the tallgrass prairies in the east, the state is home to hundreds of wildflower species, yet the primary guide to these flowers has been out of print for almost two decades. Now back in a second edition with updated nomenclature, refined plant descriptions, better photographs where improvements were called for, and a new design, Jon Farrar’s Field Guide to Wildflowers of Nebraska and the Great Plains, originally published by NEBRASKAland magazine and the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, is a visual treat and educational guide to some of the region’s showiest and most interesting wildflowers.
 
Organizing species by color, Farrar provides scientific, common, and family names; time of flowering; distribution both for Nebraska specifically and for the Great Plains in general; and preferred habitat including soil type and plant community from roadsides to woodlands to grasslands. Descriptions of each species are succinct and accessible; Farrar packs a surprising amount of information into a compact space. For many species, he includes intriguing notes about edibility, medicinal uses by Native Americans and early pioneers, similar species and varieties, hybridization, and changes in status as plants become uncommon or endangered. Superb color photographs allow each of the 274 wildflowers to be easily identified and pen-and-ink illustrations provide additional details for many species.
 
It is a joy to have this new edition riding along on car seats and in backpacks helping naturalists at all levels of expertise explore prairies, woodlands, and wetlands in search of those ever-changing splashes of color we call wildflowers.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to Wisconsin Grasses
Field Guide to Wisconsin Grasses
Emmet J. Judziewicz , Robert W. Freckmann, Lynn G. Clark, Merel R. Black
University of Wisconsin Press, 2014
Grasses are the foremost plant family of prairies, savannas, barrens, many agricultural landscapes, lawns, and successional habitats throughout Wisconsin, yet they are notoriously difficult to identify. This field guide to 232 species of Wisconsin grasses includes more than 1,100 illustrations. Setting a new standard as the first new, illustrated midwestern grass identification manual to appear since the 1960s, it provides up-to-date, comprehensive information for naturalists, gardeners, landscapers, nursery horticulturalists, community restoration professionals, agronomists and biologists, and any outdoors lover.

The book includes:
• species descriptions and distribution maps for all 232 species
• more than 700 color photographs accompanying species descriptions
• drawings of most species
• chapters on grass morphology and grasses in natural communities
• keys to all species, including an illustrated key to genera
• a glossary of grass terminology.
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to Wisconsin Sedges
Field Guide to Wisconsin Sedges
An Introduction to the Genus Carex (Cyperaceae)
Andrew L. Hipp; Illustrations by Rachel D. Davis; Maps and Appendices by Merel R. Black and Theodore S. Cochrane
University of Wisconsin Press, 2008
Sedges are among the world’s most diverse and ecologically important plant families, with almost two hundred species in Wisconsin alone. These grass-like plants, found mostly in wetlands, are increasingly popular with landscapers and home gardeners. Learning to identify sedges is challenging, however, and the available technical guides to the sedge family can be overwhelming to a nonspecialist. Field Guide to Wisconsin Sedges is a beautifully illustrated introduction to the largest sedge genus, Carex, which alone makes up about 7 percent of the flora of the upper Midwest.
            Written primarily for naturalists, wild plant enthusiasts, and native landscapers, this book is unique in its accessible format and illustrations. With this book, readers can learn to recognize key structures needed to identify approximately 150 Carex species found in Wisconsin. Author Andrew Hipp shows how to identify many of the major groupings of sedges that are used in guides to the genus throughout the world.
           Field Guide to Wisconsin Sedges includes information on habitat and range drawn from Hipp’s extensive field experience and inspection of thousands of herbarium sheets. Primarily an identification guide, the book is also a valuable source of habitat information for landscapers, gardeners, and restorationists.

Features:
• Keys to all Wisconsin Carex species, arranged by section
• Distribution maps for all species
• Species descriptions and detailed habitat information for more than 50 common species
• Color illustrations of whole plants or details for more than 70 species
• Appendix summarizing dominant Carex species by Wisconsin habitat
• A glossary of terms
• Water-resistant paperback cover
 
[more]

front cover of Field Guide to Wisconsin Streams
Field Guide to Wisconsin Streams
Plants, Fishes, Invertebrates, Amphibians, and Reptiles
Michael A. Miller, Katie Songer, and Ron Dolen
University of Wisconsin Press, 2014
From bubbling spring-fed headwaters to quiet, marshy creeks and tannin-stained northern reaches, Wisconsin is home to 84,000 miles of streams. This guide is the ultimate companion for learning about the animals and plants in Wisconsin streams. A collaborative effort by dozens of biologists and ecologists, Field Guide toWisconsin Streams is accessible to anglers, teachers and students, amateur naturalists, and experienced scientists alike.
            More than 1,000 images illustrate the species in this field guide. These images are augmented by detailed ecological and taxonomic notes, descriptions of look-alike species, and distribution maps. The guide identifies:
• more than 130 common plants
• all 120 fishes known to inhabit Wisconsin streams
• 8 crayfishes
• 50 mussels
• 10 amphibians
• 17 reptiles
• 70 families of insects
• other commonly found invertebrates.

Best Regional General Interest Books, selected by the American Association of School Librarians

Best Regional General Interest Books, selected by the Public Library Reviewers
[more]

front cover of Gleason's Plants of Michigan
Gleason's Plants of Michigan
A Field Guide
Revised by Richard K. Rabeler
University of Michigan Press, 1998

“For every plant enthusiast in the Great Lakes State, and . . . in the adjoining ones as well.”
—John J. Pipoly III, SIDA

“A very handy field guide . . . this book will be of use to anyone in northeastern North America.”
—C. Barre Hellquist, Rhodora

“It can be used to identify most of the plants . . . in Michigan and adjacent areas.”
—James E. Eckenwalder, Wildflower

Gleason’s Plants of Michigan is a major revision and expansion of The Plants of Michigan by Henry A. Gleason—the 1918 classic field guide to the flowering plants and trees found in Michigan, neighboring Great Lakes States, and southern Ontario. Richard K. Rabeler has completely updated the family descriptions and added easy-to-use keys. Information on habitats and geographical distribution is now included as well as a comprehensive index of plant names, an illustrated section on terminology, a glossary, and an introduction to botany in Michigan.

Gleason’s Plants of Michigan will be useful to naturalists, environmental specialists, botanists, and everyone who loves the wildflowers and native flora of Michigan and the surrounding areas.

[more]

front cover of In Search of Swampland
In Search of Swampland
A Wetland Sourcebook and Field Guide
Ralph W. Tiner
Rutgers University Press, 2005
In the revised and expanded edition of this classic guide, Ralph W. Tiner introduces readers to the ecology and beauty of the wetlands in eastern North America. Topics include their formation and functions, wetland types, causes of loss and degradation, and recent efforts to protect them. The discussion now includes many examples from the Great Lakes region and information on best management practices for working in and around wetlands including vernal pools. A new chapter on classification and assessment further clarifies how the unique characteristics of these important natural resources serve specific functions.In Search of Swampland alsoprovides a field guide to wetland plants, soils, and animals. It includes detailed descriptions and illustrations—many of which are new to this edition—of more than 300 plants and 200 animals. Clear identification keys, information on how to distinguish typical hydric or “wet” soils from dryland soils, and general procedures for identifying wetlands in the field make this book an indispensable resource for readers with little or no training in wetland science, as well as for the scientist or amateur naturalist.
[more]

front cover of Mammals, Amphibians, and Reptiles of Costa Rica
Mammals, Amphibians, and Reptiles of Costa Rica
A Field Guide
By Carrol L. Henderson
University of Texas Press, 2010

To help visitors, as well as local residents, identify and enjoy the wildlife of Costa Rica, Carrol L. Henderson published Field Guide to the Wildlife of Costa Rica in 2002, and it instantly became the indispensable guide. Now Henderson has created a field guide dedicated to the monkeys, sloths, treefrogs, lizards, crocodiles, and other animals that travelers are most likely to see while exploring the wild lands of Costa Rica. He includes fascinating information on their natural history, ecology, identification, and behavior gleaned from his forty years of travels, studies, and wildlife viewing in Costa Rica, as well as details on where to see these remarkable and beautiful creatures. The mammals, amphibians, and reptiles are illustrated by stunning and colorful photographs—most of which were taken in the wild by Henderson. A detailed and invaluable appendix that identifies many of Costa Rica's best wildlife-watching destinations, lodges, and contact information for trip-planning purposes completes the volume.

[more]

front cover of More than Cool Reason
More than Cool Reason
A Field Guide to Poetic Metaphor
George Lakoff and Mark Turner
University of Chicago Press, 1989
"The authors restore metaphor to our lives by showing us that it's never gone away. We've merely been taught to talk as if it had: as though weather maps were more 'real' than the breath of autumn; as though, for that matter, Reason was really 'cool.' What we're saying whenever we say is a theme this book illumines for anyone attentive." — Hugh Kenner, Johns Hopkins University

"In this bold and powerful book, Lakoff and Turner continue their use of metaphor to show how our minds get hold of the world. They have achieved nothing less than a postmodern Understanding Poetry, a new way of reading and teaching that makes poetry again important." — Norman Holland, University of Florida
[more]

front cover of Mushrooms of the Gulf Coast States
Mushrooms of the Gulf Coast States
A Field Guide to Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida
By Alan E. Bessette, Arleen F. Bessette, and David P. Lewis
University of Texas Press, 2019

The weather patterns and topography of America's Gulf Coast create favorable growing conditions for thousands of species of mushrooms, but the complete region has generally gone uncharted when it comes to mycology. Mushrooms of the Gulf Coast States at last delivers an in-depth, high-quality, user-friendly field guide, featuring more than 1,000 common and lesser-known species—some of which are being illustrated in color for the first time.

Using easily identifiable characteristics and a color key, the authors enable anyone, whether amateur mushroom hunter or professional mycologist, to discern and learn about the numerous species of mushrooms encountered in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. Wild-food enthusiasts will appreciate the information on edibility or toxicity that accompanies each description, and they will also find the book’s detailed instructions for collecting, cleaning, testing, preserving, and cooking wild mushrooms to be of great interest. Providing encyclopedic knowledge in a handy format that fits in a backpack, Mushrooms of the Gulf Coast States is a must-have for any mushroom lover.

[more]

front cover of Neotropical Rainforest Mammals
Neotropical Rainforest Mammals
A Field Guide
Louise H. Emmons and François Feer
University of Chicago Press, 1997
Neotropical Rainforest Mammals, the first color-illustrated field guide to these marvelously diverse and elusive creatures, has enjoyed tremendous success since its initial publication in 1990. Ecotourists and field researchers alike have applauded this guide's compact size, light weight, and durability. More important, they have appreciated its clear and concise accounts of the mammals of this broad region. Each species account includes information on identifying characteristics, similar species, vocalizations, behavior and natural history, geographic range, conservation status, local names, and references to the scientific literature.

In this completely revised and updated second edition:

A total of 226 species are treated in full (206 were included in the first edition).

All species accounts retained from the first edition have been updated to include the most recent research.

All 195 maps showing the distribution and geographic range of each species have been revised to reflect the most current information.

Twenty-nine beautiful color plates illustrate more than 220 species (including significant color variants between males and females or adults and young). Seven black-and-white plates contain more than 60 images of individual species, mainly bats.

A compact disc of mammal vocalizations—crucial to identifying nocturnal and otherwise cryptic animals that sometimes may be heard rather than seen—will be available for purchase separately.

Praise for the first edition:

"If you can't go to the Central and South American rain forests to see firsthand their threatened ecosystems, here is the next best thing."—Washington Post Book World

"A large amount of information is presented concisely and in a way that is easy to use."—Choice

"The presentation and wealth of information contained in this field guide is outstanding and will satisfy the needs of both the 'tourist' and 'researcher' traveling to the Neotropics."—Canadian Field-Naturalist
[more]

front cover of The Old Barn Book
The Old Barn Book
A Field Guide to North American Barns & Other Farm Structures
Noble, Allen G
Rutgers University Press, 1996
Barns give character to the countryside. Their structures reflect the ethnic heritage of a region's settlers and the nature of the land itself. With The Old Barn Book, you'll be able to spot the difference between a Dutch barn and a Swedish barn, a barn for cows and a barn for tobacco. You'll find out why some barns have hipped roofs and others gables, why some have doors at the end and others have them on the side, why some are wood and some are stone, why some are round. Whether you are nostalgic for farm life or like to drive out in the country or want to join in the barn preservation movement, you will find this book an indispensable guide.
[more]

front cover of Snake Road
Snake Road
A Field Guide to the Snakes of LaRue-Pine Hills
Joshua J. Vossler
Southern Illinois University Press, 2021
Visiting the mecca of snake watching

Twice a year, spring and fall, numerous species of reptiles and amphibians migrate between the LaRue–Pine Hills’ towering limestone bluffs and the Big Muddy River’s swampy floodplain in southern Illinois. Snakes, especially great numbers of Cottonmouths, give the road that separates these distinct environments its name. Although it is one of the best places in the world to observe snakes throughout the year, spring and fall are the optimal times to see a greater number and variety. Among the many activities that snakes can be observed doing are sunning themselves on rocks, lying in grasses, sheltering under or near fallen tree limbs, or crossing the road. In this engaging guide, author Joshua J. Vossler details what to expect and how to make the most of a visit to what is known around the world as Snake Road.

Vossler catalogs twenty-three native snake species by both common and scientific names, lists identifying features, and estimates the probability of spotting them. Throughout this book, stunning color photographs of each species’ distinctive physical characteristics enable identification by sight only, an important feature, since Illinois law prohibits the handling, harming, or removal of reptiles and other wildlife on and around the road. Since snakes are visually variable—individual snakes of the same species can differ tremendously in size, color, and pattern—photographs of as many variations as possible are included. To aid in identification, eleven sets of photographs contrast the features of similar species and point out how and why these snakes may be easily confused. Visitors can keep track of the snakes they have identified by using the checklist in the back of the book. A list of recommended reading provides sources of additional information about snakes in southern Illinois and beyond.
 
[more]

front cover of Texas Amphibians
Texas Amphibians
A Field Guide
By Bob L. Tipton, Terry L. Hibbitts, Troy D. Hibbitts, Toby J. Hibbitts, and Travis J. LaDuc
University of Texas Press, 2012

With a wide variety of habitats ranging from southeastern swamps to western deserts, Texas is home to numerous species of frogs, toads, and salamanders. Each area of Texas has a particular set of species that has evolved there over thousands of years. Indeed, most amphibians are not very mobile, and many live their entire lives within a few square meters. This makes them particularly vulnerable to environmental degradation and habitat destruction.

Texas Amphibians is the only field guide focused exclusively on the state’s frogs, toads, and salamanders. It presents brief, general accounts of the two orders and fifteen families. Then it identifies each of the seventy-two species in detail, including size, description, voice (if applicable), similar species, distribution (with maps), natural history, reproduction, subspecies (if applicable), and comments and conservation information. Color photographs illustrate the species.

The book also includes a general introduction to amphibian natural history, conservation, observation and collection, maintenance in captivity, museum and preserved specimens, and scientific and common names, as well as scientific keys to Texas salamanders and frogs and a generic key to amphibian larvae. This wealth of information, compiled by a team of experts who collectively have over a century of experience in field herpetology, will increase our appreciation for amphibians and the vital role they play as an early indicator of threats to the quality of the environment that we all share.

[more]

front cover of Texas Lizards
Texas Lizards
A Field Guide
By Troy and Toby Hibbitts
University of Texas Press, 2015

“Texas offers the opportunity to observe lizard diversity like no other part of the country,” writes Laurie J. Vitt in the foreword to Texas Lizards. From the moist eastern Piney Woods to the western deserts, lizards can be found in every part of Texas. The state has forty-five native and six naturalized species of lizards, almost half of the 115 species that live in the continental United States. Yet Texas lizards have not received full coverage in regional field guides, and no other guide dedicated solely to the state’s lizards has ever been published.

Texas Lizards is a complete identification guide to all fifty-one native and established exotic lizard species. It offers detailed species accounts, range maps, and excellent color photographs (including regional, gender, and age variations for many species) to aid field identification. The authors, two of the state’s most knowledgeable herpetologists, open the book with a broad overview of lizard natural history, conservation biology, observation, and captive maintenance before providing a key to Texas lizards and accounts of the various lizard families and species. Appendices list species of questionable occurrence in Texas and nonestablished exotic species. Informational resources on Texas lizards, a map of Texas counties, a glossary, a bibliography, and indexes of common and scientific names round out the volume.

[more]

front cover of Texas Mushrooms
Texas Mushrooms
A Field Guide
By Susan and Van Metzler
University of Texas Press, 1992

Hundreds of species of mushrooms flourish in Texas, from the desert and semiarid regions of West Texas to the moist and acid soils of East Texas, where species that can also be found in South America live alongside those that might be spotted in Malaysia and Europe. Texas Mushrooms was the first—and is still the only—guide to all of the state’s mushrooms.

This colorful, easy-to-follow book will surprise and delight uninitiated nature enthusiasts while also supplying the experienced mushroom hunter with expert identification information. Excellent color photographs and precise descriptions of over 200 species will enable the mushroom hunter—even the amateur—to make quick, careful, easy distinctions between the edible varieties and the potentially toxic ones. In addition, kitchen-tested recipes are included, along with charts giving spore sizes and a list of recommended further reading.

In Texas, mushroom hunting can be a year-round, state-wide activity, and with this enticing field guide, collecting, identifying, and preparing wild mushrooms will become an activity the entire family can enjoy while appreciating the beauty of Texas from a new and fascinating angle.

[more]

front cover of Texas Snakes
Texas Snakes
A Field Guide
By James R. Dixon, John E. Werler, and Michael R. J. Forstner; Line drawings by Regina Levoy
University of Texas Press, 2020
With species ranging from the legendary, fear-inspiring western diamond-backed rattlesnake to the tiny threadsnake, Texas has a greater diversity of snakes than any other state in the country. This fully illustrated field guide to Texas snakes, written by two of the state’s most respected herpetologists and updated by their student and later colleague, gives you the most current and complete information to identify and understand all 111 species and subspecies. Texas Snakes: A Field Guide has all the resources you need to identify snakes in the wild and in your own backyard:• 113 full-color, close-up photos that show every snake, as well as, 39 detailed line drawings• 113 range maps• Up-to-date species accounts that describe each snake’s appearance, look-alikes, size, and habitats• A checklist of all Texas snakes with a key to the species• Reliable information on venomous snakes and prevention of or initial treatment for snakebite• Concise discussion of conservation, classification, and identification approachesDrawn from the lead authors’ monumental, definitive Texas Snakes: Identification, Distribution, and Natural History, this field guide is your must-have source for identifying any snakes you see in Texas.
[more]

front cover of Texas Snakes
Texas Snakes
A Field Guide
By James R. Dixon and John E. Werler
University of Texas Press, 2005
From the legendary, fear-inspiring western diamond-backed rattlesnake to the tiny, harmless plains blind snake, Texas has a greater diversity of snake species than any other state in the country. This fully illustrated field guide to Texas snakes, written by two of the state's most respected herpetologists, gives you the most current and complete information to identify and understand all 110 species and subspecies. Texas Snakes: A Field Guide has all the resources you need to identify snakes in the wild and in your yard:• 110 full-color, close-up photos that show every snake, as well as 39 detailed line drawings• 110 range maps• Up-to-date species accounts that describe each snake's appearance, look-alikes, size, and habitat• A checklist of all Texas snakes and a key to the species• Reliable information on poisonous snakes and preventing and treating snakebites• Concise guides to snake conservation, classification, and identificationDrawn from the authors' monumental, definitive Texas Snakes: Identification, Distribution, and Natural History, this field guide is your must-have source for identifying any snake you see in Texas.
[more]

front cover of Texas Turtles & Crocodilians
Texas Turtles & Crocodilians
A Field Guide
By Troy D. Hibbitts and Terry L. Hibbitts
University of Texas Press, 2016

Texas has a large and diverse turtle population, with forms that are found nowhere else (Cagle’s Map Turtle and the Texas Map Turtle) and wide-ranging species that barely touch the state, including the Painted Turtles and the Rough-footed Mud Turtle. From the Sabine River to El Paso, and from the Rio Grande to the Panhandle, thirty-one native and established exotic turtle species are definitely known in Texas, along with one crocodilian, the American Alligator.

Texas Turtles & Crocodilians is the first complete identification guide to all the state’s turtles and to its single alligator. It offers detailed species accounts, range maps, and excellent color photographs to aid in field identification. The authors, two of the state’s most knowledgeable herpetologists, open the book with a broad overview of turtle natural history, conservation biology, observation, and captive maintenance before providing a key to Texas turtles and accounts of the various turtle families and species. Appendices provide brief accounts of species that occurred prehistorically in Texas and non-established exotic species, as well as a table of Texas’ major watersheds and the turtle diversity in each one. Informational resources on Texas turtles and alligators, a map of Texas counties, a glossary, a bibliography, and indexes of common and scientific names complete the volume.

[more]

front cover of Texas Wildflowers
Texas Wildflowers
A Field Guide
By Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller; updated by Joe Marcus; foreword to the first edition by Lady Bird Johnson
University of Texas Press, 2018

With more than 175,000 copies sold, Texas Wildflowers has established itself as the go-to guide for identifying the state’s roadside flowers. This new edition has been completely reorganized by flower colors (and within each color section, by flowering season) to make it even easier to identify the flowers you see as you travel through Texas. Every wildflower is illustrated with a beautiful full-color photograph—over 250 of which are new to this edition. All of the descriptive identifying information is presented in a consistent format—common and botanical names, plant and leaves, flowers and fruit, flowering season, habitat and range, and notes.

What hasn’t changed is the book’s sturdy binding, which will hold up through years of active use, and its wealth of information, which has been thoroughly updated by the expert staff of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center:

  • 300 species descriptions, including engaging comments about the plants’ natural histories, landscape uses, edible or medicinal properties, and folklore
  • A map of Texas’s vegetational areas
  • Glossaries that define and illustrate botanical terms
  • A bibliography of books for learning more about wildflowers
  • Indexes to common and botanical plant names, as well as plant families, that distinguish between native and non-native species

As Lady Bird Johnson observed in the foreword, Texas Wildflowers “makes me want to reach for my sunhat, put on my walking shoes, take this knowledge-filled book, and fare forth to seek and discover!”

[more]

front cover of Tiger Beetles of the Southeastern United States
Tiger Beetles of the Southeastern United States
A Field Guide
Giff Beaton, R. Stephen Krotzer, and Brian D. Holt
University of Alabama Press, 2021
Combines current data and taxonomic classifications for tiger beetles in the Southeast with stunning close-up photographs, flight season charts, and distribution maps

Tiger beetles are brightly colored and metallic beetles, often with ivory or cream-colored markings. They are most abundant and diverse in habitats near bodies of water with sandy or clay soils and can be found along rivers, on sea and lake shores, on sand dunes, around dry lakebeds, on clay banks, or on woodland paths. Conservatively estimated, the group comprises more than 2,600 species worldwide.
 
Tiger Beetles of the Southeastern United States identifies and describes 52 taxa (42 species and 10 additional subspecies) of tiger beetles that occur in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Stunning close-up photographs accompany current taxonomic and biological information in a volume designed for a growing audience of enthusiastic amateurs and professionals alike.
 
The authors provide an in-depth description of the anatomy, life cycle, and behavior of tiger beetles; an overview of the various southeastern habitats in which they occur; instructions for finding, identifying, and photographing them in the wild; and the conservation status of various species. The individual species accounts include stunning, detailed images, flight season charts, county-level regional distribution maps, and discussion of identifying features, habitat, similar species, and subspecies when applicable. The appendix includes two species previously found in Florida but no longer known to exist there.
 
The result is the most complete field guide to date on tiger beetles in the region. With more than 230 images of beetles and their habitats, as well as life history and distribution data, this book is essential for tiger beetle enthusiasts, naturalists of all kinds, photographers, biologists, and teachers throughout the region.
 
[more]

logo for Utah State University Press
Utah Wildflowers
Field Guide to the Northern and Central Mountains and Valleys
Richard Shaw
Utah State University Press, 1995

A visual guide to the wildflowers that inhabit the mountains and valleys of northern and central Utah every spring and summer. A must for the hiker, biker, or lover of the outdoors. Includes over 100 full-color photographs.

[more]

front cover of Vascular Flora of Illinois
Vascular Flora of Illinois
A Field Guide, Fourth Edition
Robert H. Mohlenbrock
Southern Illinois University Press, 2013

This latest edition of Vascular Flora of Illinois includes over thirty-four hundred species of flora from Illinois, adding more than 250 newly-recognized plants to this definitive collection. Because cataloguing our heritage is foremost in importance among naturalists, this book compiles essential information about plants in Illinois. Mohlenbrock includes all known taxa native to Illinois either at present or in the past and all non-native vascular plants that grow spontaneously and appear able to maintain themselves year after year without cultivation. The sequence of groups in the guide is ferns, coni­fers, and flowering plants, with cotyledons given before monocotyledons. Within each group, the fami­lies are arranged alphabetically, as are the genera within each family and the species within each genus. For each taxon recognized in this book, Mohlenbrock gives us a common name if one is generally used in Illinois. He follows this with an indication of flowering time for flowering plants, and of spore-production time in the case of ferns and their relatives. He also provides a habitat statement and a general comment on distribution in Illinois for each taxon.

Containing information on Illinois flora not available anywhere else, this fourth edition of Vascular Flora of Illinois is essential for ecologists, environmentalists, and land developers. Those interested in wildflower identification will also find this guide helpful.

[more]

front cover of Venomous Snakes of Texas
Venomous Snakes of Texas
A Field Guide
By Andrew H. Price
University of Texas Press, 2009

Texas has about one hundred twenty native species and subspecies of snakes, fifteen of which are venomous. Since 1950, Texans have turned to the Poisonous Snakes of Texas pamphlet series published by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department for help in identifying these snakes and for expert advice on preventing and treating snakebite. Venomous Snakes of Texas, a thoroughly revised and updated edition of Poisonous Snakes, carries on this tradition as a one-stop, all-you-need-to-know guide to Texas's rattlesnakes, copperheads, cottonmouths, and coral snakes.

In this authoritative field guide, you'll find:

  • Full-color photographs and a county-by-county distribution map for each species.
  • Each species' common and scientific name, description, look-alikes, and a summary sketch of its habitat, behavior, reproduction, venom characteristics, predator-prey relationships, and fossil record.
  • Up-to-date advice on recognizing venomous snakes and preventing and treating snakebite, both at home and in the field.
  • A glossary of terms and an extensive bibliography.

A special feature of this guide is an expanded treatment of the ecological and evolutionary context in which venomous snakes live, which supports Price's goal "to lessen the hatred and fear and to increase the understanding, the respect, and even the appreciation with which venomous snakes should be regarded."

[more]

front cover of Where the Wild Books Are
Where the Wild Books Are
A Field Guide to Ecofiction
Jim Dwyer
University of Nevada Press, 2010

As interest in environmental issues grows, many writers of fiction have embraced themes that explore the connections between humans and the natural world. Ecologically themed fiction ranges from profound philosophical meditations to action-packed entertainments. Where the Wild Books Are offers an overview of nearly 2,000 works of nature-oriented fiction. The author includes a discussion of the precursors and history of the genre, and of its expansion since the 1970s. He also considers its forms and themes, as well as the subgenres into which it has evolved, such as speculative fiction, ecodefense, animal stories, mysteries, ecofeminist novels, cautionary tales, and others. A brief summary and critical commentary of each title is included. Dwyer’s scope is broad and covers fiction by Native American writers as well as ecofiction from writers around the world. Far more than a mere listing of books, Where the Wild Books Are is a lively introduction to a vast universe of engaging, provocative writing. It can be used to develop book collections or curricula. It also serves as an introduction to one of the most fertile areas of contemporary fiction, presenting books that will offer enjoyable reading and new insights into the vexing environmental questions of our time.

[more]

front cover of Woody Plants of Utah
Woody Plants of Utah
A Field Guide with Identification Keys to Native and Naturalized Trees, Shrubs, Cacti, and Vines
Renée Van Buren, Janet G. Cooper, Leila M. Shultz, and Kimball T. Harper
Utah State University Press, 2011

A comprehensive guide that includes a vast range of species and plant communities and employs thorough, original keys. Based primarily on vegetative characteristics, the keys don't require that flowers or other reproductive features be present, like many plant guides. And this guide's attention to woody plants as a whole allows one to identify a much greater variety of plants. That especially suits an arid region such as Utah with less diverse native trees. Woody plants are those that have stems that persist above ground even through seasons that don't favor growth, due to low precipitation or temperatures.

Woody Plants of Utah employs dichotomous identification keys that are comparable to a game of twenty questions. They work through a process of elimination by choosing sequential alternatives.

Detailed, illustrated plant descriptions complement the keys and provide additional botanical and environmental information in relation to a useful introductory categorization of Utah plant communities. Supplementary tools include photos, distribution maps, and an illustrated glossary.

[more]


Send via email Share on Facebook Share on Twitter