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Neuromatic: Or, A Particular History of Religion and the Brain
by John Lardas Modern
University of Chicago Press, 2021
Cloth: 978-0-226-79718-2 | eISBN: 978-0-226-79959-9 | Paper: 978-0-226-79962-9
Library of Congress Classification BL65.B73M63 2021
Dewey Decimal Classification 612.82

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
John Modern offers a powerful and original critique of neurology’s pivotal role in religious history.

In Neuromatic, religious studies scholar John Lardas Modern offers a sprawling and critical examination of the history of the cognitive revolution and current attempts to locate all that is human in the brain, including spirituality itself. Neuromatic is a wildly original take on the entangled histories of science and religion that lie behind our brain-laden present: from eighteenth-century revivals to the origins of neurology and mystic visions of mental piety in the nineteenth century; from cyberneticians, Scientologists, and parapsychologists in the twentieth century, to contemporary claims to have discovered the neural correlates of religion.

What Modern reveals via this grand tour is that our ostensibly secular turn to the brain is bound up at every turn with the religion it discounts, ignores, or actively dismisses. In foregrounding the myths, ritual schemes, and cosmic concerns that have accompanied idealizations of neural networks and inquiries into their structure, Neuromatic takes the reader on a dazzling and disturbing ride through the history of our strange subservience to the brain.
Nearby on shelf for Religions. Mythology. Rationalism / Philosophy of religion. Psychology of religion. Religion: