cover of book
 

Changing Hands: Industry, Evolution, and the Reconfiguration of the Victorian Body
by Peter Capuano
University of Michigan Press, 2015
eISBN: 978-0-472-12140-3 | Paper: 978-0-472-05284-4 | Cloth: 978-0-472-07284-2
Library of Congress Classification PR878.B63C37 2015
Dewey Decimal Classification 823.8093561

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
In Changing Hands, Peter J. Capuano sifts through Victorian literature and culture for changes in the way the human body is imagined in the face of urgent questions about creation, labor, gender, class, and racial categorization, using “hands” (the “distinguishing mark of . . . humanity”) as the primary point of reference. Capuano complicates his study by situating the historical argument in the context of questions about the disappearance of hands during the twentieth century into the haze of figurative meaning. Out of this curious aporia, Capuano exposes a powerful, “embodied handedness” as the historical basis for many of the uncritically metaphoric, metonymic, and/or ideogrammatic approaches to the study of the human body in recent critical discourse.

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