cover of book
 

Listen to Me Good: The Story of an Alabama Midwife
by MARGARET CHARLES SMITH
The Ohio State University Press, 1996
Paper: 978-0-8142-0701-7 | Cloth: 978-0-8142-0700-0 | eISBN: 978-0-8142-8178-9
Library of Congress Classification RG962.E98S65 1996
Dewey Decimal Classification 618.20233

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK

Margaret Charles Smith, a ninety-one-year-old Alabama midwife, has thousands of birthing stories to tell. Sifting through nearly five decades of providing care for women in rural Greene County, she relates the tales that capture the life-and-death struggle of the birthing experience and the traditions, pharmacopeia, and spiritual attitudes that influenced her practice. She debunks images of the complacent southern “granny” midwife and honors the determination, talent, and complexity of midwifery.


Fascinating to read, this book is part of the new genre of writing that recognizes the credibility of midwives who have emerged from their own communities and were educated through apprenticeship and personal experience. Past descriptions of southern black midwives have tended to denigrate their work in comparison with professional established medicine. Believed to be the oldest living (though retired) traditional African American midwife in Alabama, Smith is one of the few who can recount old-time birthing ways. Despite claims that midwives contributed to high infant mortality rates, Smith’s story emphasizes midwives' successes in facing medical challenges and emergencies.

Nearby on shelf for Gynecology and obstetrics / Obstetrics / Maternal care. Prenatal care services: