front cover of Beyond Money
Beyond Money
A Postcapitalist Strategy
Anitra Nelson
Pluto Press, 2022
'A fascinating portal into arguments about why we need to get beyond money' - Harry Cleaver

What would a world without money look like? This book is a lively thought experiment that deepens our understanding of how money is the driver of political power, environmental destruction and social inequality today, arguing that it has to be abolished rather than repurposed to achieve a postcapitalist future.

Grounded in historical debates about money, Anitra Nelson draws on a spectrum of political and economic thought and activism, including feminism, ecoanarchism, degrowth, permaculture, autonomism, Marxism and ecosocialism. Looking to Indigenous rights activism and the defense of commons, an international network of activists engaged in a fight for a money-free society emerges.

Beyond Money shows that, by organizing around post-money versions of the future, activists have a hope of creating a world that embodies their radical values and visions.
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Building a Green Economy
Perspectives from Ecological Economics
Robert B. Richardson
Michigan State University Press, 2013

The first decade of the twenty-first century has been characterized by a growing global awareness of the tremendous strains that human economic activity place on natural resources and the environment. As the world’s population increases, so does the demand for energy, food, and other resources, which adds to existing stresses on ecosystems, with potentially disastrous consequences. Humanity is at a crossroads in our pathway to future prosperity, and our next steps will impact our long-term sustainability immensely. In this timely volume, leading ecological economics scholars offer a variety of perspectives on building a green economy. Grounded in a critique of conventional thinking about unrestrained economic expansion and the costs of environmental degradation, this book presents a roadmap for an economy that prioritizes human welfare over consumerism and growth. As the authors represented here demonstrate, the objective of ecological economics is to address contemporary problems and achieve long-term socioeconomic well-being without undermining the capacity of the ecosphere. The volume is organized around three sections: “Perspectives on a Green Economy,” “Historical and Theoretical Perspectives,” and “Applications and Practice.” A rich resource in its own right, Building a Green Economy contains the most innovative thinking in ecological economics at a critical time in the reexamination of the human relationship with the natural world.

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China’s Engine of Environmental Collapse
Richard Smith
Pluto Press, 2020

As the world hurtles towards environmental oblivion, China is leading the charge. The nation's CO2 emissions are more than twice those of the US with a GDP just two-thirds as large. China leads the world in renewable energy yet it is building new coal-fired power plants faster than renewables. The country's lakes, rivers, and farmlands are severely polluted yet China's police state can't suppress pollution, even from its own industries.

This is the first book to explain these contradictions. Richard Smith explains how the country's bureaucratic rulers are driven by nationalist-industrialist tendencies that are even more powerful than the drive for profit under 'normal' capitalism. In their race to overtake the US they must prioritise hyper-growth over the environment, even if this ends in climate collapse and eco-suicide.

Smith contends that nothing short of drastic shutdowns and the scaling back of polluting industries, especially in China and the US, will suffice to slash greenhouse gas emissions enough to prevent climate catastrophe.

[more]

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Climate Games
Experiments on How People Prevent Disaster
Talbot M. Andrews, Andrew W. Delton, and Reuben Kline
University of Michigan Press, 2024
Can humanity work together to mitigate the effects of climate change? Climate Games argues we can. This book brings together a decade and a half of experimentation, conducted by researchers around the world, which shows that people can and will work together to prevent disasters like climate change. These experiments, called economic games, put money on the line to create laboratory disasters. Participants must work together by spending a bit of money now to prevent themselves from losing even more money in the future. Will people sacrifice their own money to prevent disaster? Can people make wise decisions? And can people decide wisely on behalf of others? The answer is a resounding yes. 

Yet real climate change is a complex social dilemma involving the world’s nearly eight billion inhabitants. In the real world, the worst effects of climate change are likely to be felt by developing countries, while most of the decisions will be made by rich, industrialized countries. And while the world as a whole would be better off if all nations reduced their greenhouse gas emissions, any given nation could decide it would be even better off if it continued emitting and let other nations take care of the problem. These disaster experiments test how real people respond to climate change’s unique constellation of challenges and deliver a positive message: People will prevent disaster.
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A Climate Policy Revolution
What the Science of Complexity Reveals about Saving Our Planet
Roland Kupers
Harvard University Press, 2020

Humanity’s best hope for confronting the looming climate crisis rests with the new science of complexity.

The sheer complexity of climate change stops most solutions in their tracks. How do we give up fossil fuels when energy is connected to everything, from great-power contests to the value of your pension? Global economic growth depends on consumption, but that also produces the garbage now choking the oceans. To give up cars, coal, or meat would upend industries and entire ways of life. Faced with seemingly impossible tradeoffs, politicians dither and economists offer solutions at the margins, all while we flirt with the sixth extinction.

That’s why humanity’s last best hope is the young science of complex systems. Quitting coal, making autonomous cars ubiquitous, ending the middle-class addiction to consumption: all necessary to head off climate catastrophe, all deemed fantasies by pundits and policymakers, and all plausible in a complex systems view.

Roland Kupers shows how we have already broken the interwoven path dependencies that make fundamental change so daunting. Consider the mid-2000s, when, against all predictions, the United States rapidly switched from a reliance on coal primarily to natural gas. The change required targeted regulations, a few lone investors, independent researchers, and generous technology subsidies. But in a stunningly short period of time, shale oil nudged out coal, and carbon dioxide emissions dropped by 10 percent. Kupers shows how to replicate such patterns in order to improve transit, reduce plastics consumption, and temper the environmental impact of middle-class diets. Whether dissecting China’s Ecological Civilization or the United States’ Green New Deal, Kupers describes what’s folly, what’s possible, and which solutions just might work.

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front cover of The Designer's Atlas of Sustainability
The Designer's Atlas of Sustainability
Ann Thorpe
Island Press, 2007
Designing for sustainability is an innovation shaping both the design industry and design education today.Yet architects, product designers, and other key professionals in this new field have so far lacked a resource that addresses their sensibilities and concerns. The Designer's Atlas of Sustainability now explores the basic principles, concepts, and practice of sustainable design in a visually sophisticated and engaging style. The book tackles not only the ecological aspects of sustainable design-designers' choice of materials and manufacturing processes have a tremendous impact on the natural world-but also the economic and cultural elements involved.

The Atlas is neither a how-to manual nor collection of recipes for sustainable design, but a compendium of fresh approaches to sustainability that designers can incorporate into daily thinking and practice. Illuminating many facets of this exciting field, the book offers ideas on how to harmonize human and natural systems, and then explores practical options for making the business of design more supportive of long-term sustainability. An examination of the ethical dimensions of sustainable development in our public and private lives is the theme present throughout. Like other kinds of atlases, The Designer's Atlas of Sustainability illustrates its subject, but it goes far beyond its visual appeal, stimulating design solutions for "development that cultivates environmental and social conditions that will support human well-being indefinitely."
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front cover of Designing Innovative Corporate Water Risk Management Strategies from an Ecosystem Services Perspective
Designing Innovative Corporate Water Risk Management Strategies from an Ecosystem Services Perspective
Daniel Gerding
Michigan Publishing Services, 2014

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Ecological Debt
Global Warming and the Wealth of Nations
Andrew Simms
Pluto Press, 2009

This is the second edition of Andrew Simms's highly regarded guide to ecological debt.

Simms shows how millions of us in the West are running up huge ecological debts: from the amount of oil and coal that we burn to heat our houses and run our cars, to what we consume and the waste that we create, the impact of our lifestyles is felt worldwide. Whilst these debts go unpaid, millions more living in poverty in the majority world suffer the burden of paying dubious foreign financial debts.

The book explores a great paradox of our age: how the global wealth gap was built on ecological debts, which the world's poorest are now having to pay for. Highlighting how and why this has happened, he also shows what can be done differently in the future. Now updated throughout, this is a clear and passionate account of the steps we can take to stop pushing the planet to the point of environmental bankruptcy.

[more]

front cover of Ecological Economics, Second Edition
Ecological Economics, Second Edition
Principles and Applications
Herman E. Daly and Joshua Farley
Island Press, 2009
In its first edition, this book helped to define the emerging field of ecological economics. This new edition surveys the field today. It incorporates all of the latest research findings and grounds economic inquiry in a more robust understanding of human needs and behavior. Humans and ecological systems, it argues, are inextricably bound together in complex and long-misunderstood ways.
According to ecological economists, conventional economics does not reflect adequately the value of essential factors like clean air and water, species diversity, and social and generational equity. By excluding biophysical and social systems from their analyses, many conventional economists have overlooked problems of the increasing scale of human impacts and the inequitable distribution of resources.
This introductory-level textbook is designed specifically to address this significant flaw in economic thought. The book describes a relatively new “transdiscipline” that incorporates insights from the biological, physical, and social sciences. It provides students with a foundation in traditional neoclassical economic thought, but places that foundation within an interdisciplinary framework that embraces the linkages among economic growth, environmental degradation, and social inequity. In doing so, it presents a revolutionary way of viewing the world.
The second edition of Ecological Economics provides a clear, readable, and easy-to-understand overview of a field of study that continues to grow in importance. It remains the only stand-alone textbook that offers a complete explanation of theory and practice in the discipline.
[more]

front cover of Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy
Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy
Volume 1
Edited by Matthew J. Kotchen, James H. Stock, and Catherine D. Wolfram
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2020
This volume presents six new papers on environmental/energy economics and policy. Robert Stavins evaluates carbon taxes versus a cap-and-trade mechanism for reducing greenhouse-gas emissions, arguing that specific design features of either instrument can be more consequential than the choice of instrument itself. Lucas Davis and James Sallee show that the exemption of electric vehicles from the gasoline tax is likely to be efficient as long as gasoline prices remain below social marginal costs, even though it results in lower tax revenue. Caroline Flammer analyzes the rapidly growing market for green bonds and highlights the importance of third-party certification to  the financial and environmental performance of publically traded companies. Antonio Bento, Mark Jacobsen, Christopher Knittel, and Arthur van Benthem develop a general framework for evaluating the costs and benefits of fuel economy standards and use it to account for the differences between several recent studies of changes in these standards.  Nicholas Muller estimates a measure of output in the U.S. economy over the last 60 years that accounts for air pollution damages, and shows  that pollution effects are sizable, affect growth rates, and have diminished appreciably over time. Finally, Marc Hafstead and Roberton Williams illustrate methods of accounting for  employment effects  when evaluating the costs and benefits of environmental regulations.   
[more]

front cover of Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy
Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy
Volume 2
Edited by Matthew J. Kotchen, James H. Stock, and Catherine D. Wolfram
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2020
This volume presents six new papers on environmental and energy economics and related policy issues. Robert Pindyck provides a systematic overview of what is known, and remains unknown, about climate change, along with the implications of uncertainty for climate policy. Shaikh Eskander, Sam Fankhauser, and Joana Setzer offer insights from a comprehensive data set on climate change legislation and litigation across all countries of the world over the past thirty years. Adele Morris, Noah Kaufman, and Siddhi Doshi shine a light on how expected trends in the coal industry will create significant challenges for the local public finance of coal-reliant communities. Joseph Aldy and his collaborators analyze the treatment of co-benefits in benefit-cost analyses of federal clean air regulations. Tatyana Deryugina and her co-authors report on the geographic and socioeconomic heterogeneity in the benefits of reducing particulate matter air pollution. Finally, Oliver Browne, Ludovica Gazze, and Michael Greenstone use detailed data on residential water consumption to evaluate the relative impacts of conservation policies based on prices, restrictions, and public persuasion.
[more]

front cover of Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy
Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy
Volume 3
Edited by Matthew J. Kotchen, Tatyana Deryugina, and James H. Stock
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022
This volume presents six new papers on environmental and energy economics and policy in the United States. Rebecca Davis, J. Scott Holladay, and Charles Sims analyze recent trends in and forecasts of coal-fired power plant retirements with and without new climate policy. Severin Borenstein and James Bushnell examine the efficiency of pricing for electricity, natural gas, and gasoline. James Archsmith, Erich Muehlegger, and David Rapson provide a prospective analysis of future pathways for electric vehicle adoption. Kenneth Gillingham considers the consequences of such pathways for the design of fuel vehicle economy standards. Frank Wolak investigates the long-term resource adequacy in wholesale electricity markets with significant intermittent renewables. Finally, Barbara Annicchiarico, Stefano Carattini, Carolyn Fischer, and Garth Heutel review the state of research on the interactions between business cycles and environmental policy.
[more]

front cover of Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy
Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy
Volume 4
Edited by Matthew J. Kotchen, Tatyana Deryugina, and James H. Stock
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
Rigorous, careful, and nonpartisan research with a high policy impact on environmental and energy economics.

Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy focuses on the effective and efficient management of environmental and energy challenges. Research papers offer new evidence on the intended and unintended consequences, the market and nonmarket effects, and the incentive and distributional impacts of policy initiatives and market developments.

This volume presents six new papers on environmental and energy economics and policy. Gilbert Metcalf examines the distributional impacts of substituting a vehicle miles-traveled tax for the existing federal excise tax in the United States. David Weisbach, Samuel Kortum, Michael Wang, and Yujia Yao consider solutions to the leakage problem of climate policy with differential tax policies on the supply and demand for fossil fuels and on domestic production and consumption. Danae Hernandez-Cortes, Kyle Meng, and Paige Weber quantify and decompose recent trends in air pollution disparities in the US electricity sector. Severin Borenstein and Ryan Kellogg provide a comparative analysis of different incentive-based mechanisms to reduce emissions in the electricity sector on a path to zero emissions. Sarah Anderson, Andrew Plantinga, and Matthew Wibbenmeyer document distributional differences in the allocation of  US wildfire prevention projects. Finally, Mark Curtis and Ioana Marinescu provide new evidence on the quality and quantity of emerging “green” jobs in the United States.
[more]

front cover of Environmental Economics for Tree Huggers and Other Skeptics
Environmental Economics for Tree Huggers and Other Skeptics
William K. Jaeger
Island Press, 2006

Though many students and environmentalists shudder at even the thought of economics, a working knowledge of the basics can be a powerful ally. Economic arguments carry a great deal of weight, and putting them to work for environmental causes can be a deciding factor, especially in policy debates. The reverse is true as well, and an understanding of the possibly flawed, misleading, or overstated economics behind an opponent's case can be crucially important.

Environmental Economics for Tree Huggers and Other Skeptics carefully explains the tools of economic analysis and shows how they can be used to help reveal the root causes of and potential solutions for environmental and natural resource problems. Jaeger's proven techniques and wonderfully conversational tone assume no economics training, and his presentation of the material is designed to facilitate clarity. His step-by-step approach unearths surprisingly simple, easy-to-remember principles and shows how to apply them to real-world environmental problems.

Those with exposure to introductory microeconomics will find Environmental Economics for Tree Huggers and Other Skeptics to be a welcome refresher. Undergraduate and graduate students of environmental studies, resource management, law, policy, and related fields, as well as novices who are skeptical of how the field could possibly help them in their own efforts, will be pleasantly surprised.

[more]

front cover of Farming with Nature
Farming with Nature
The Science and Practice of Ecoagriculture
Edited by Sara J. Scherr and Jeffrey A. McNeely
Island Press, 2007
A growing body of evidence shows that agricultural landscapes can be managed not only to produce crops but also to support biodiversity and promote ecosystem health. Innovative farmers and scientists, as well as indigenous land managers, are developing diverse types of “ecoagriculture” landscapes to generate cobenefits for production, biodiversity, and local people.

Farming with Nature offers a synthesis of the state of knowledge of key topics in ecoagriculture. The book is a unique collaboration among renowned agricultural and ecological scientists, leading field conservationists, and farm and community leaders to synthesize knowledge and experience across sectors. The book examines:
  • the knowledge base for ecoagriculture as well as barriers, gaps, and opportunities for developing improved ecoagriculture systems
  • what we have learned about managing landscapes to achieve multiple objectives at a landscape scale
  • existing incentives for farmers, other land managers, and investors to develop and invest in ecoagriculture systems
  • pathways to develop, implement, manage, and scale up successful ecoagriculture
Insights are drawn from around the world, in tropical, Mediterranean, and temperate environments, from farming systems that range from highly commercialized to semi-subsistence. Farming with Nature is an important new work that can serve as a foundation document for planners, farm organizations, researchers, project developers, and policy makers to develop strategies for promoting and sustaining ecoagriculture landscapes. Replete with valuable best practice guidelines, it is a critical resource for both practitioners and researchers in
the field.
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front cover of A Field Guide to Conservation Finance
A Field Guide to Conservation Finance
Story Clark
Island Press, 2007
Finally, a comprehensive book on land conservation financing for community and regional conservation leaders. A Field Guide to Conservation Finance provides essential advice on how to tackle the universal obstacle to protecting private land in America: lack of money.
 
Story Clark dispels the myths that conservationists can access only private funds controlled by individuals or that only large conservation organizations have clout with big capital markets. She shows how small land conservation organizations can achieve conservation goals using both traditional and cutting-edge financial strategies. Clark outlines essential tools for raising money, borrowing money, and reducing the cost of transactions. She covers a range of subjects including transfer fees, voluntary surcharges, seller financing, revolving funds, and Project Related Investment programs (PRIs). A clear, well-written overview of the basics of conservation finance with useful insights and real stories combine to create a book that is an invaluable and accessible guide for land trusts seeking to protect more land.
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front cover of Golden Rules
Golden Rules
The Origins of California Water Law in the Gold Rush
Mark Kanazawa
University of Chicago Press, 2015
Fresh water has become scarce and will become even more so in the coming years, as continued population growth places ever greater demands on the supply of fresh water. At the same time, options for increasing that supply look to be ever more limited. No longer can we rely on technological solutions to meet growing demand. What we need is better management of the available water supply to ensure it goes further toward meeting basic human needs. But better management requires that we both understand the history underlying our current water regulation regime and think seriously about what changes to the law could be beneficial.

For Golden Rules, Mark Kanazawa draws on previously untapped historical sources to trace the emergence of the current framework for resolving water-rights issues to California in the 1850s, when Gold Rush miners flooded the newly formed state. The need to circumscribe water use on private property in support of broader societal objectives brought to light a number of fundamental issues about how water rights ought to be defined and enforced through a system of laws. Many of these issues reverberate in today’s contentious debates about the relative merits of government and market regulation. By understanding how these laws developed across California’s mining camps and common-law courts, we can also gain a better sense of the challenges associated with adopting new property-rights regimes in the twenty-first century.
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The Green Economy
Environment, Sustainable Development and the Politics of the Future
Michael Jacobs
Pluto Press, 1992

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Green Growth That Works
Natural Capital Policy and Finance Mechanisms Around the World
Edited by Lisa Mandle, Zhiyun Ouyang, James Salzman, and Gretchen C. Daily
Island Press, 2019
Rapid economic development has been a boon to human well-being. It has lifted millions out of poverty, raised standards of living, and increased life expectancies. But economic development comes at a significant cost to natural capital—the fertile soils, forests, coastal marshes, farmland—that support all life on earth, including our own. The dilemma of our times is to figure out how to improve the human condition without destroying nature’s. If ecosystems collapse, so eventually will human civilization. One answer is inclusive green growth—the efficient use of natural resources. Inclusive green growth minimizes pollution and strengthens communities against natural disasters while reducing poverty through improved access to health, education, and services. Its genius lies in working with nature rather than against it.

Green Growth That Works is the first practical guide to bring together pragmatic finance and policy tools that can make investment in natural capital both attractive and commonplace. The authors present six mechanisms that demonstrate a range of approaches used around the globe to conserve and restore earth’s myriad ecosystems, including:
  • Government subsidies
  • Regulatory-driven mitigation
  • Voluntary conservation
  • Water funds
  • Market-based transactions
  • Bilateral and multilateral payments
Through a series of real-world case studies, the book addresses questions such as: How can we channel economic incentives to make conservation and restoration desirable? What approaches have worked best? How can governments, businesses, NGOs, and individuals work together successfully?

Pioneered by leading scholars from the Natural Capital Project, this valuable compendium of proven techniques can guide agencies and organizations eager to make green growth work anywhere in the world.
 
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The Greening of Industry
A Risk Management Approach
John D. Graham
Harvard University Press, 1997
Environmentalists often perceive the risk management approach to environmental and public health policy as a tool to block regulation of industrial pollution. In contrast, this book presents six case studies which provide examples of how federal risk-based regulation has encouraged industry’s investment in pollution control. The authors trace the impact of risk management on the regulation of lead in gasoline, ozone-depleting chemicals, and emissions from the dry cleaning, pulp and paper, coke, and municipal waste combustor industries.
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Healthy Buildings
Joseph G. Allen and John D. Macomber
Harvard University Press, 2020

A New York Times Favorite Book of the Year for Healthy Living
A Fortune Best Book of the Year
An AIA New York Book of the Year


“This book should be essential reading for all who commission, design, manage, and use buildings—indeed anyone who is interested in a healthy environment.”
—Norman Foster


As schools and businesses around the world consider when and how to reopen their doors to fight COVID-19, the Director of Harvard’s Healthy Buildings Program and Harvard Business School’s leading expert on urban resilience reveal what you can do to harness the power of your offices, homes, and schools to protect your health—and boost every aspect of your performance and well-being.

Ever feel tired during a meeting? That’s because most conference rooms are not bringing in enough fresh air. When that door opens, it literally breathes life back into the room. But there is a lot more acting on your body that you can’t feel or see. From our offices and homes to schools, hospitals, and restaurants, the indoor spaces where we work, learn, play, eat, and heal have an outsized impact on our performance and well-being. They affect our creativity, focus, and problem-solving ability and can make us sick—jeopardizing our future and dragging down profits in the process.

Charismatic pioneers of the healthy building movement who have paired up to combine the cutting-edge science of Harvard’s School of Public Health with the financial know-how of the Harvard Business School, Joseph Allen and John Macomber make a compelling case in this urgently needed book for why every business and home owner should make certain relatively low-cost investments a top priority. Grounded in exposure and risk science and relevant to anyone newly concerned about how their surroundings impact their health, Healthy Buildings can help you evaluate the impact of small, easily controllable environmental fluctuations on your immediate well-being and long-term reproductive and lung health. It shows how our indoor environment can have a dramatic impact on a whole host of higher order cognitive functions—including things like concentration, strategic thinking, troubleshooting, and decision-making. Study after study has found that your performance will dramatically improve if you are working in optimal conditions (with high rates of ventilation, few damaging persistent chemicals, and optimal humidity, lighting and noise control). So what would it take to turn that knowledge into action?

Cutting through the jargon to explain complex processes in simple and compelling language, Allen and Macomber show how buildings can both expose you to and protect you from disease. They reveal the 9 Foundations of a Healthy Building, share insider tips, and show how tracking what they call “health performance indicators” with smart technology can boost a company’s performance and create economic value. With decades of practice in protecting worker health, they offer a clear way forward right now, and show us what comes next in a post-COVID world. While the “green” building movement introduced important new efficiencies, it’s time to look beyond the four walls—placing the decisions we make around buildings into the larger conversation around development and health, and prioritizing the most important and vulnerable asset of any building: its people.

[more]

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In Defense of Public Lands
The Case against Privatization and Transfer
Steven Davis
Temple University Press, 2018

Debates continue to rage over the merits or flaws of public land and whether or not it should be privatized—or at least, radically reconfigured in some way. In Defense of Public Lands offers a comprehensive refutation of the market-oriented arguments. Steven Davis passionately advocates that public land ought to remain firmly in the public’s hands. He reviews empirical data and theoretical arguments from biological, economic, and political perspectives in order to build a case for why our public lands are an invaluable and irreplaceable asset for the American people. 

In Defense of Public Lands briefly lays out the history and characteristics of public lands at the local, state, and federal levels while examining the numerous policy prescriptions for their privatization or, in the case of federal lands, transfer. He considers the dimensions of environmental health; markets and valuation of public land, the tensions between collective values and individual preferences, the nature and performance of bureaucratic management, and the legitimacy of interest groups and community decision-making. Offering a fair, good faith overview of the privatizers’ best arguments before refuting them, this timely book contemplates both the immediate and long-term future of our public lands.

[more]

front cover of Introducing a New Economics
Introducing a New Economics
Pluralist, Sustainable and Progressive
Jack Reardon, Maria Alejandra Caporale Madi and Molly Scott Cato
Pluto Press, 2015
Students and lecturers worldwide increasingly reject the narrow curricula and lack of intellectual diversity that characterize mainstream economics. They demand that the real world should be brought back into the classroom in order to most effectively confront current crises. Introducing a New Economics is a groundbreaking textbook that heralds this revolution in the teaching of economics. With a firm commitment to theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary pluralism, the authors challenge the institutional education hegemony head on. This unique textbook reflects a new ethos of economics teaching that highlights sustainability and justice through its discussion of work, employment, power, capital, markets, money, and debt. A progressive work, it will set the standard for the growing heterodox economics movement for years to come.
 
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front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 1 (January 2023)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 1 (January 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 10 issue 1 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 2 (March 2023)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 2 (March 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 10 issue 2 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 3 (May 2023)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 3 (May 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 10 issue 3 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 4 (July 2023)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 4 (July 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 10 issue 4 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 5 (September 2023)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 5 (September 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 10 issue 5 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 6 (November 2023)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 10 number 6 (November 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 10 issue 6 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 11 number 1 (January 2024)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 11 number 1 (January 2024)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2024
This is volume 11 issue 1 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 11 number 2 (March 2024)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 11 number 2 (March 2024)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2024
This is volume 11 issue 2 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
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front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 7 number 3 (May 2020)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 7 number 3 (May 2020)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2020
This is volume 7 issue 3 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 9 number 6 (November 2022)
Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, volume 9 number 6 (November 2022)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022
This is volume 9 issue 6 of Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. As an official research journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, JAERE publishes papers that are devoted to environmental and natural resource issues. The journal's principal mission is to provide a forum for the scholarly exchange of ideas in the intersection of human behavior and the natural environment. Focusing on original, full-length research papers that offer substantial new insights for scholars of environmental and resource economics, JAERE presents a range of articles that are relevant for public policy, using approaches that are theoretical, empirical, or both.
[more]

front cover of Klimat
Klimat
Russia in the Age of Climate Change
Thane Gustafson
Harvard University Press, 2021

A discerning analysis of the future effects of climate change on Russia, the major power most dependent on the fossil fuel economy.

Russia will be one of the countries most affected by climate change. No major power is more economically dependent on the export of hydrocarbons; at the same time, two-thirds of Russia’s territory lies in the arctic north, where melting permafrost is already imposing growing damage. Climate change also brings drought and floods to Russia’s south, threatening the country’s agricultural exports.

Thane Gustafson predicts that, over the next thirty years, climate change will leave a dramatic imprint on Russia. The decline of fossil fuel use is already underway, and restrictions on hydrocarbons will only tighten, cutting fuel prices and slashing Russia’s export revenues. Yet Russia has no substitutes for oil and gas revenues. The country is unprepared for the worldwide transition to renewable energy, as Russian leaders continue to invest the national wealth in oil and gas while dismissing the promise of post-carbon technologies. Nor has the state made efforts to offset the direct damage that climate change will do inside the country. Optimists point to new opportunities—higher temperatures could increase agricultural yields, the melting of arctic ice may open year-round shipping lanes in the far north, and Russia could become a global nuclear-energy supplier. But the eventual post-Putin generation of Russian leaders will nonetheless face enormous handicaps, as their country finds itself weaker than at any time in the preceding century.

Lucid and thought-provoking, Klimat shows how climate change is poised to alter the global order, potentially toppling even great powers from their perches.

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Making Climate Tech Work
Policies that Drive Innovation
Alon Tal
Island Press, 2024
Climate tech is critical for averting planetary chaos. Half the greenhouse gas reductions required to reach “net-zero” climate targets in 2050 will need to come from technologies that have not yet been invented.  Without effective government interventions, market incentives alone will not produce a rapid transition to a low-carbon economy. The commercial value of innovative climate technology, especially in its early phases, remains underpriced—far below its social value. The good news is that smart policies can change these dynamics and catalyze the necessary creativity and investment in clean technology, and its deployment. The key question is: which approaches can lead us to future carbon neutrality, and which are likely to fall short?

In Making Climate Tech Work, environmental policy expert Alon Tal demystifies climate innovation programs around the world—no policy background needed. Beginning with a review of government’s general role in technology policy development, Tal assesses each policy alternative, describing eye-opening experiments in diverse countries, presenting a range of case studies, interviewing leading decarbonization experts, and interpreting new empirical data. Discover how Germany incentivized renewables; Denmark became a wind energy superpower; Australia phased out incandescent bulbs; California’s prisons pioneered low-carbon menus; and why carbon taxes have failed around the world—but could be designed for success.

Tal distills the benefits and drawbacks of each policy, along with related ethical questions and public perceptions. He concludes by addressing two commonly overlooked issues in climate policy: disruption of workers’ livelihoods from the clean energy transition; and integrating the Global South into the planet’s new low-carbon economy—as the region that has contributed least to climate change but which must be part of a global solution. Tal not only evaluates which policy strategies effectively reduce emissions but also how they can promote climate tech innovation.

Humanity is ultimately in a race against time and effective climate policies are critical to ensure a sustainable future. Making Climate Tech Work serves as an essential primer for policymakers, academics, activists, and anyone interested in climate solutions.
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Making Peace with the Earth
Vandana Shiva
Pluto Press, 2013

In this compelling and rigorously documented exposition, Vandana Shiva demolishes the myths propagated by corporate globalisation in its pursuit of profit and power and shows its devastating environmental impact.

Shiva argues that consumerism lubricates the war against the earth and that corporate control violates all ethical and ecological limits. She takes the reader on a journey through the world's devastated eco-landscape, one of genetic engineering, industrial development and land-grabs in Africa, Asia and South America. She concludes that exploitation of this order is incurring an ecological and economic debt that is unsustainable.

Making Peace with the Earth outlines how a paradigm shift to earth-centred politics and economics is our only chance of survival and how collective resistance to corporate exploitation can open the way to a new environmentalism.

[more]

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Marine Resource Economics, volume 37 number 3 (July 2022)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022

logo for University of Chicago Press Journals
Marine Resource Economics, volume 37 number 4 (October 2022)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022

front cover of Marine Resource Economics, volume 38 number 1 (January 2023)
Marine Resource Economics, volume 38 number 1 (January 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 38 issue 1 of Marine Resource Economics. Marine Resource Economics (MRE) publishes creative and scholarly economic analyses of a range of issues related to natural resource use in the global marine environment. The scope of the journal includes conceptual and empirical investigations aimed at addressing real-world ocean and coastal policy problems. MRE is an outlet for early results and imaginative new thinking on emerging topics in the marine environment, as well as rigorous theoretical and empirical analyses of questions that have long interested economists who study the oceans. A pluralistic forum for researchers and policy makers, MRE encourages challenges to conventional paradigms and perspectives. The journal is comprised of five sections: Articles, Perspectives, Case Studies, Systematic Reviews, and Book Reviews.
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front cover of Marine Resource Economics, volume 38 number 2 (April 2023)
Marine Resource Economics, volume 38 number 2 (April 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 38 issue 2 of Marine Resource Economics. Marine Resource Economics (MRE) publishes creative and scholarly economic analyses of a range of issues related to natural resource use in the global marine environment. The scope of the journal includes conceptual and empirical investigations aimed at addressing real-world ocean and coastal policy problems. MRE is an outlet for early results and imaginative new thinking on emerging topics in the marine environment, as well as rigorous theoretical and empirical analyses of questions that have long interested economists who study the oceans. A pluralistic forum for researchers and policy makers, MRE encourages challenges to conventional paradigms and perspectives. The journal is comprised of five sections: Articles, Perspectives, Case Studies, Systematic Reviews, and Book Reviews.
[more]

front cover of Marine Resource Economics, volume 38 number 3 (July 2023)
Marine Resource Economics, volume 38 number 3 (July 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 38 issue 3 of Marine Resource Economics. Marine Resource Economics (MRE) publishes creative and scholarly economic analyses of a range of issues related to natural resource use in the global marine environment. The scope of the journal includes conceptual and empirical investigations aimed at addressing real-world ocean and coastal policy problems. MRE is an outlet for early results and imaginative new thinking on emerging topics in the marine environment, as well as rigorous theoretical and empirical analyses of questions that have long interested economists who study the oceans. A pluralistic forum for researchers and policy makers, MRE encourages challenges to conventional paradigms and perspectives. The journal is comprised of five sections: Articles, Perspectives, Case Studies, Systematic Reviews, and Book Reviews.
[more]

front cover of Marine Resource Economics, volume 38 number 4 (October 2023)
Marine Resource Economics, volume 38 number 4 (October 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 38 issue 4 of Marine Resource Economics. Marine Resource Economics (MRE) publishes creative and scholarly economic analyses of a range of issues related to natural resource use in the global marine environment. The scope of the journal includes conceptual and empirical investigations aimed at addressing real-world ocean and coastal policy problems. MRE is an outlet for early results and imaginative new thinking on emerging topics in the marine environment, as well as rigorous theoretical and empirical analyses of questions that have long interested economists who study the oceans. A pluralistic forum for researchers and policy makers, MRE encourages challenges to conventional paradigms and perspectives. The journal is comprised of five sections: Articles, Perspectives, Case Studies, Systematic Reviews, and Book Reviews.
[more]

front cover of Marine Resource Economics, volume 39 number 1 (January 2024)
Marine Resource Economics, volume 39 number 1 (January 2024)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2024
This is volume 39 issue 1 of Marine Resource Economics. Marine Resource Economics (MRE) publishes creative and scholarly economic analyses of a range of issues related to natural resource use in the global marine environment. The scope of the journal includes conceptual and empirical investigations aimed at addressing real-world ocean and coastal policy problems. MRE is an outlet for early results and imaginative new thinking on emerging topics in the marine environment, as well as rigorous theoretical and empirical analyses of questions that have long interested economists who study the oceans. A pluralistic forum for researchers and policy makers, MRE encourages challenges to conventional paradigms and perspectives. The journal is comprised of five sections: Articles, Perspectives, Case Studies, Systematic Reviews, and Book Reviews.
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front cover of Markets and the Environment
Markets and the Environment
Nathaniel O. Keohane and Sheila M. Olmstead
Island Press, 2007
Markets and the Environment is a concise yet comprehensive introduction to a topic of central importance in understanding a wide range of environmental issues and policy approaches. It offers a clear overview of the fundamentals of environmental economics that will enable students and professionals to quickly grasp important concepts and to apply those concepts to real-world environmental problems. In addition, the book integrates normative, policy, and institutional issues at a principles level. Chapters examine: the benefits and costs of environmental protection, markets and market failure, natural resources as capital assets, and sustainability and economic development.
 
Markets and the Environment is the second volume in the Foundations of Contemporary Environmental Studies Series, edited by James Gustave Speth. The series presents concise guides to essential subjects in the environmental curriculum, incorporating a problem-based approach to teaching and learning.
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front cover of Markets and the Environment, Second Edition
Markets and the Environment, Second Edition
Nathaniel O. Keohane and Sheila M. Olmstead
Island Press, 2015
A clear grasp of economics is essential to understanding why environmental problems arise and how we can address them. So it is with good reason that Markets and the Environment has become a classic text in environmental studies since its first publication in 2007. Now thoroughly revised with updated information on current environmental policy and real-world examples of market-based instruments, the primer is more relevant than ever.
 
The authors provide a concise yet thorough introduction to the economic theory of environmental policy and natural resource management. They begin with an overview of environmental economics before exploring topics including cost-benefit analysis, market failures and successes, and economic growth and sustainability. Readers of the first edition will notice new analysis of cost estimation as well as specific market instruments, including municipal water pricing and waste disposal. Particular attention is paid to behavioral economics and cap-and-trade programs for carbon.
 
Throughout, Markets and the Environment is written in an accessible, student-friendly style. It includes study questions for each chapter, as well as clear figures and relatable text boxes. The authors have long understood the need for a book to bridge the gap between short articles on environmental economics and tomes filled with complex algebra. Markets and the Environment makes clear how economics influences policy, the world around us, and our own lives. 
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front cover of MRE vol 35 num 1
MRE vol 35 num 1
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2020
This is volume 35 issue 1 of Marine Resource Economics. Marine Resource Economics (MRE) publishes creative and scholarly economic analyses of a range of issues related to natural resource use in the global marine environment. The scope of the journal includes conceptual and empirical investigations aimed at addressing real-world ocean and coastal policy problems. MRE is an outlet for early results and imaginative new thinking on emerging topics in the marine environment, as well as rigorous theoretical and empirical analyses of questions that have long interested economists who study the oceans. A pluralistic forum for researchers and policy makers, MRE encourages challenges to conventional paradigms and perspectives. The journal is comprised of five sections: Articles, Perspectives, Case Studies, Systematic Reviews, and Book Reviews.
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front cover of National Accounts and Environmentally Sustainable National Income
National Accounts and Environmentally Sustainable National Income
Roefie Hueting and Bart de Boer
Eburon Academic Publishers, 2019
Our planet is threatened by a mistaken confidence in erroneously calculated growth. The term “economic growth” can only mean an increase in human welfare, but it is often wrongly identified with production growth that may in fact be destructive to the environment. Thus, while the measures of standard National Income (NI) or Gross Domestic Product (GDP) are useful for many purposes, they are inadequate in guiding environmental policy making. This book develops the corrective concept of an environmentally Sustainable National Income (eSNI). eSNI is defined as the maximally attainable level of production, using the technology of the year under review, whereby the vital environmental functions (possible uses) of the not-human-made physical surroundings remain available for future generations. In order to accurately judge environmental sustainability, the authors show, NI and eSNI must be addressed jointly. Drawing on data from the Netherlands from 1990 to 2015, the authors demonstrate the effectiveness of eSNI and argue that national statistical bureaus around the world should provide this measure to their own policymakers, so that policymaking across the globe might be informed by sound information about both national economies and the global environment.
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front cover of Nature in the Global South
Nature in the Global South
Environmental Projects in South and Southeast Asia
Paul Greenough and Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, eds.
Duke University Press, 2003
A nuanced look at how nature has been culturally constructed in South and Southeast Asia, Nature in the Global South is a major contribution to understandings of the politics and ideologies of environmentalism and development in a postcolonial epoch. Among the many significant paradigms for understanding both the preservation and use of nature in these regions are biological classification, state forest management, tropical ecology, imperial water control, public health, and community-based conservation. Focusing on these and other ways that nature has been shaped and defined, this pathbreaking collection of essays describes projects of exploitation, administration, science, and community protest.

With contributors based in anthropology, ecology, sociology, history, and environmental and policy studies, Nature in the Global South features some of the most innovative and influential work being done in the social studies of nature. While some of the essays look at how social and natural landscapes are created, maintained, and transformed by scientists, officials, monks, and farmers, others analyze specific campaigns to eradicate smallpox and save forests, waterways, and animal habitats. In case studies centered in the Philippines, India, Pakistan, Thailand, Indonesia, and South and Southeast Asia as a whole, contributors examine how the tropics, the jungle, tribes, and peasants are understood and transformed; how shifts in colonial ideas about the landscape led to extremely deleterious changes in rural well-being; and how uneasy environmental compromises are forged in the present among rural, urban, and global allies.

Contributors:
Warwick Anderson
Amita Baviskar
Peter Brosius
Susan Darlington
Michael R. Dove
Ann Grodzins Gold
Paul Greenough
Roger Jeffery
Nancy Peluso
K. Sivaramakrishnan
Nandini Sundar
Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing
Charles Zerner

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Nature's Fortune
How Business and Society Thrive By Investing in Nature
Mark R. Tercek and Jonathan S. Adams
Island Press, 2015
What is nature worth? The answer to this question—which traditionally has been framed in environmental terms—is revolutionizing the way we do business.

In Nature’s Fortune, Mark Tercek, CEO of The Nature Conservancy and former investment banker, and science writer Jonathan Adams argue that nature is not only the foundation of human well-being, but also the smartest commercial investment any business or government can make. The forests, floodplains, and oyster reefs often seen simply as raw materials or as obstacles to be cleared in the name of progress are, in fact as important to our future prosperity as technology or law or business innovation.

Who invests in nature, and why? What rates of return can it produce? When is protecting nature a good investment? With stories from the South Pacific to the California coast, from the Andes to the Gulf of Mexico and even to New York City, Nature’s Fortune shows how viewing nature as green infrastructure allows for breakthroughs not only in conservation—protecting water supplies; enhancing the health of fisheries; making cities more sustainable, livable, and safe; and dealing with unavoidable climate change—but in economic progress, as well. Organizations obviously depend on the environment for key resources—water, trees, and land. But they can also reap substantial commercial benefits in the form of risk mitigation, cost reduction, new investment opportunities, and the protection of assets. Once leaders learn how to account for nature in financial terms, they can incorporate that value into the organization’s decisions and activities, just as habitually as they consider cost, revenue, and ROI.

A must-read for business leaders, CEOs, investors, and environmentalists alike, Nature’s Fortune offers an essential guide to the world’s economic—and environmental—well-being.
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A People’s Green New Deal
Max Ajl
Pluto Press, 2021

'Hands-down the best book yet on the Green New Deal' - Jason Hickel

The idea of a Green New Deal was launched into popular consciousness by US Congressperson Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in 2018. It has become a watchword in the current era of global climate crisis. But what - and for whom - is the Green New Deal?

In this concise and urgent book, Max Ajl provides an overview of the various mainstream Green New Deals. Critically engaging with their proponents, ideological underpinnings and limitations, he goes on to sketch out a radical alternative: a 'People's Green New Deal' committed to decommodification, working-class power, anti-imperialism and agro-ecology.

Ajl diagnoses the roots of the current socio-ecological crisis as emerging from a world-system dominated by the logics of capitalism and imperialism. Resolving this crisis, he argues, requires nothing less than an infrastructural and agricultural transformation in the Global North, and the industrial convergence between North and South. As the climate crisis deepens and the literature on the subject grows, A People's Green New Deal contributes a distinctive perspective to the debate.

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front cover of The Politics of Permaculture
The Politics of Permaculture
Terry Leahy
Pluto Press, 2021

Permaculture is an environmental movement that makes us revaluate what it means to be sustainable. Through innovative agriculture and settlement design, the movement creates new communities that are harmonious with nature. It has grown from humble origins on a farm in 1970s Australia and flourished into a worldwide movement that confronts industrial capitalism.

The Politics of Permaculture is one of the first books to unpack the theory and practice of this social movement that looks to challenge the status quo. Drawing upon the rich seam of publications and online communities from the movement as well as extensive interviews with permaculture practitioners and organizations from around the world, Leahy explains the ways permaculture is understood and practiced in different contexts.

In the face of extreme environmental degradation and catastrophic climate change, we urgently need a new way of living.

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The Politics of Permaculture
Terry Leahy
Pluto Press, 2021

Permaculture is an environmental movement that makes us revaluate what it means to be sustainable. Through innovative agriculture and settlement design, the movement creates new communities that are harmonious with nature. It has grown from humble origins on a farm in 1970s Australia and flourished into a worldwide movement that confronts industrial capitalism.

The Politics of Permaculture is one of the first books to unpack the theory and practice of this social movement that looks to challenge the status quo. Drawing upon the rich seam of publications and online communities from the movement as well as extensive interviews with permaculture practitioners and organizations from around the world, Leahy explains the ways permaculture is understood and practiced in different contexts.

In the face of extreme environmental degradation and catastrophic climate change, we urgently need a new way of living.

[more]

front cover of The Progress Illusion
The Progress Illusion
Reclaiming Our Future from the Fairytale of Economics
Jon D. Erickson
Island Press, 2022
We live under the illusion of progress: as long as GDP is going up and prices stay low, we accept poverty and pollution as unfortunate but inevitable byproducts of a successful economy. In fact, the infallibility of the free market and the necessity of endless growth are so ingrained in the public consciousness that they seem like scientific fact. Jon Erickson asks, why? With the planet in peril and humanity in crisis, how did we get duped into believing the fairytale of economics? And how can we get past the illusion to design an economy that is socially just and ecologically balanced?

In The Progress Illusion, Erickson charts the rise of the economic worldview and its infiltration into our daily lives as a theory of everything. Drawing on his own experience as a young economist inoculated in the 1980s era of “greed is good,” Erickson shows how pseudoscience came to dominate economic thought. He pokes holes in the conventional wisdom of neo-classical economics, illustrating how flawed theories about financial decision-making and maximizing efficiency ignore human psychology and morality. Most importantly, he demonstrates how that thinking shaped our politics and determined the course of American public policy.  The result has been a system that perpetually concentrates wealth in the hands of a few, while depleting the natural resources on which economies are based.
 
While the history of economics is dismal indeed, Erickson is part of a vigorous reform effort grounded in the realities of life on a finite planet. This new brand of economics is both gaining steam in academia and supporting social activism. The goal is people over profit, community over consumption, and resilience over recklessness. Erickson shows crafting a new economic story is the first step toward turning away from endless growth and towards enduring prosperity. 
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Reimagining Livelihoods
Life beyond Economy, Society, and Environment
Ethan Miller
University of Minnesota Press, 2019

A provocative reassessment of the concepts underlying the struggle for sustainable development

Much of the debate over sustainable development revolves around how to balance the competing demands of economic development, social well-being, and environmental protection. “Jobs vs. environment” is only one of the many forms that such struggles take. But what if the very terms of this debate are part of the problem? Reimagining Livelihoods argues that the “hegemonic trio” of economy, society, and environment not only fails to describe the actual world around us but poses a tremendous obstacle to enacting a truly sustainable future.

In a rich blend of ethnography and theory, Reimagining Livelihoods engages with questions of development in the state of Maine to trace the dangerous effects of contemporary stories that simplify and domesticate conflict. As in so many other places around the world, the trio of economy, society, and environment in Maine produces a particular space of “common sense” within which struggles over life and livelihood unfold. Yet the terms of engagement embodied by this trio are neither innocent nor inevitable. It is a contingent, historically produced configuration, born from the throes of capitalist industrialism and colonialism. Drawing in part on his own participation in the struggle over the Plum Creek Corporation’s “concept plan” for a major resort development on the shores of Moosehead Lake in northern Maine, Ethan Miller articulates a rich framework for engaging with the ethical and political challenges of building ecological livelihoods among diverse human and nonhuman communities. 

In seeking a pathway for transformative thought that is both critical and affirmative, Reimagining Livelihoods provides new frames of reference for living together on an increasingly volatile Earth.

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Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 15 number 1 (Winter 2021)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2021

logo for University of Chicago Press Journals
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 15 number 2 (Summer 2021)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2021

front cover of Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 16 number 1 (Winter 2022)
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 16 number 1 (Winter 2022)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022
This is volume 16 issue 1 of Review of Environmental Economics and Policy. The Review of Environmental Economics and Policy (REEP) is an official journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. REEP publishes symposia, articles, and regular features that contribute to one or more of the following goals: to identify and synthesize lessons learned from recent and ongoing environmental economics research; to provide economic analysis of environmental policy issues; to promote the sharing of ideas and perspectives among the various sub-fields of environmental economics; to strengthen the linkages between environmental economics research and environmental policy; to encourage communication and connections between academics and the wider policy community; to offer suggestions for future research; to provide insights and readings for use in the classroom; to address issues of interest to the environmental economics profession.
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front cover of Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 16 number 2 (Summer 2022)
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 16 number 2 (Summer 2022)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022
This is volume 16 issue 2 of Review of Environmental Economics and Policy. The Review of Environmental Economics and Policy (REEP) is an official journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. REEP publishes symposia, articles, and regular features that contribute to one or more of the following goals: to identify and synthesize lessons learned from recent and ongoing environmental economics research; to provide economic analysis of environmental policy issues; to promote the sharing of ideas and perspectives among the various sub-fields of environmental economics; to strengthen the linkages between environmental economics research and environmental policy; to encourage communication and connections between academics and the wider policy community; to offer suggestions for future research; to provide insights and readings for use in the classroom; to address issues of interest to the environmental economics profession.
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front cover of Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 17 number 1 (Winter 2023)
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 17 number 1 (Winter 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 17 issue 1 of Review of Environmental Economics and Policy. The Review of Environmental Economics and Policy (REEP) is an official journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. REEP publishes symposia, articles, and regular features that contribute to one or more of the following goals: to identify and synthesize lessons learned from recent and ongoing environmental economics research; to provide economic analysis of environmental policy issues; to promote the sharing of ideas and perspectives among the various sub-fields of environmental economics; to strengthen the linkages between environmental economics research and environmental policy; to encourage communication and connections between academics and the wider policy community; to offer suggestions for future research; to provide insights and readings for use in the classroom; to address issues of interest to the environmental economics profession.
[more]

front cover of Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 17 number 2 (Summer 2023)
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, volume 17 number 2 (Summer 2023)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2023
This is volume 17 issue 2 of Review of Environmental Economics and Policy. The Review of Environmental Economics and Policy (REEP) is an official journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. REEP publishes symposia, articles, and regular features that contribute to one or more of the following goals: to identify and synthesize lessons learned from recent and ongoing environmental economics research; to provide economic analysis of environmental policy issues; to promote the sharing of ideas and perspectives among the various sub-fields of environmental economics; to strengthen the linkages between environmental economics research and environmental policy; to encourage communication and connections between academics and the wider policy community; to offer suggestions for future research; to provide insights and readings for use in the classroom; to address issues of interest to the environmental economics profession.
[more]

front cover of Rivers of Gold
Rivers of Gold
Designing Markets To Allocate Water In California
Brent M. Haddad
Island Press, 2000

The movement to implement market-based approaches to allocating water is gaining ground across California and in other western states. Proponents argue that markets offer an efficient and cost-effective means of promoting conservation -- those who need water would pay for it on the open market, while others would conserve rather than pay increased prices.

Rivers of Gold takes a new look at California's water-reallocation challenge. The author explains the concept of water markets and the economic theory undergirding them. He shows how some water markets have worked -- and others have failed -- and gives the reader the analytic tools necessary to understand why. The book:

  • provides an overview of water-supply issues in California
  • compares the situation in California with that of other western states
  • considers the different property rights regimes governing current use and their fit with water market institutions
  • explains how water markets would work and their benefits and drawbacks as an allocation mechanism
  • presents a series of case studies of water markets currently in effect in California
  • offers a list of principles for water market design

Rivers of Gold offers a balanced understanding of both the role that markets can play in reallocating water and the limitations of the market mechanism. In the end, the author offers a comprehensive assessment of the institutional design features that any water market should incorporate if it is to reallocate water effectively, in California or in any other region where water is scarce.

Rivers of Gold is the first book to provide a detailed examination of water markets and the institutional design issues associated with them. It is the only book available that presents in-depth case studies of actual water-market transactions, and will be essential reading for water resource professionals and resource economists, as well as for students and scholars of environmental policy, environmental economics, and resource economics.

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front cover of Socialist States and the Environment
Socialist States and the Environment
Lessons for Eco-Socialist Futures
Salvatore Engel-Di Mauro
Pluto Press, 2021

More than thirty years after the collapse of the USSR, the critique of state socialism is still used to deny alternatives to capitalism, irrespective of global capitalist ecological and social devastation. There is seemingly nothing worthwhile salvaging from decades of state socialist experiences.

As the climate crisis deepens, Engel-Di Mauro argues that we need to re-evaluate the environmental practices and policies of state socialism, especially as they had more environmentally beneficial than destructive effects. Rather than dismissing state socialism’s heritage out of hand, we should reclaim it for contemporary eco-socialist ends.

By means of a comparative and multiple-scaled approach, Engel-Di Mauro points to highly diverse and environmentally constructive state socialist experiences. Taking the reader from the USSR to China and Cuba, this is a fiery and contentious look at what worked, what didn’t, and how we can move towards an eco-socialist future.

[more]

front cover of The Solutions are Already Here
The Solutions are Already Here
Strategies of Ecological Revolution from Below
Peter Gelderloos
Pluto Press, 2022
Are alternative energies and Green New Deals enough to deliver environmental justice? Peter Gelderloos argues that international governmental responses to the climate emergency are structurally incapable of solving the crisis. But there is hope.

Across the world, grassroots networks of local communities are working to realize their visions of an alternative revolutionary response to planetary destruction, often pitted against the new megaprojects promoted by greenwashed alternative energy infrastructures and the neocolonialist, technocratic policies that are the forerunners of the Green New Deal.

Gelderloos interviews food sovereignty activists in Venezuela, Indigenous communities reforesting their lands in Brazil and anarchists fighting biofuel plantations in Indonesia, looking at the battles that have cancelled airports, stopped pipelines, and helped the most marginalized to fight borders and environmental racism, to transform their cities, to win a dignified survival.
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front cover of Starved for Science
Starved for Science
How Biotechnology Is Being Kept Out of Africa
Robert PaarlbergForeword by Norman Borlaug and Jimmy Carter
Harvard University Press, 2009

Listen to a short interview with Robert PaarlbergHost: Chris Gondek | Producer: Heron & Crane

Heading upcountry in Africa to visit small farms is absolutely exhilarating given the dramatic beauty of big skies, red soil, and arid vistas, but eventually the two-lane tarmac narrows to rutted dirt, and the journey must continue on foot. The farmers you eventually meet are mostly women, hardworking but visibly poor. They have no improved seeds, no chemical fertilizers, no irrigation, and with their meager crops they earn less than a dollar a day. Many are malnourished.

Nearly two-thirds of Africans are employed in agriculture, yet on a per-capita basis they produce roughly 20 percent less than they did in 1970. Although modern agricultural science was the key to reducing rural poverty in Asia, modern farm science—including biotechnology—has recently been kept out of Africa.

In Starved for Science Robert Paarlberg explains why poor African farmers are denied access to productive technologies, particularly genetically engineered seeds with improved resistance to insects and drought. He traces this obstacle to the current opposition to farm science in prosperous countries. Having embraced agricultural science to become well-fed themselves, those in wealthy countries are now instructing Africans—on the most dubious grounds—not to do the same.

In a book sure to generate intense debate, Paarlberg details how this cultural turn against agricultural science among affluent societies is now being exported, inappropriately, to Africa. Those who are opposed to the use of agricultural technologies are telling African farmers that, in effect, it would be just as well for them to remain poor.

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front cover of Sustainability for a Warming Planet
Sustainability for a Warming Planet
Humberto Llavador, John E. Roemer, and Joaquim Silvestre
Harvard University Press, 2015

Human-generated greenhouse gas emissions imperil a global resource: a biosphere capable of supporting life as we know it. What is the fair way to share this scarce resource across present and future generations, and across regions of the world? This study offers a new perspective based on the guiding ethics of sustainability and egalitarianism.

Sustainability is understood as a pattern of economic activity over time that sustains a given rate of growth of human welfare indefinitely. To achieve this, the atmospheric concentration of carbon must be capped at some level not much higher than exists today, and investments in education and research should be higher than they currently are. International cooperation between developing and developed nations is also vital, because economic growth and the climate problem are intertwined.

The authors propose that the guiding principle of bargaining should be that the dates at which developing countries’ living standards catch up with those of developed countries should not be altered by the agreement. They conclude that developed economies would have to agree not to exceed 1 percent growth in per capita GDP annually, while developing nations should grow at a faster rate, but still lower than current projections, until they converge. The authors acknowledge that achieving such a dramatic slowdown would carry political and economic challenges.

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front cover of The Tragedy of the Commodity
The Tragedy of the Commodity
Oceans, Fisheries, and Aquaculture
Longo, Stefano B
Rutgers University Press, 2015
Winner of the 2017 Paul Sweezy Marxist Sociology Book Award from the American Sociological Association

Although humans have long depended on oceans and aquatic ecosystems for sustenance and trade, only recently has human influence on these resources dramatically increased, transforming and undermining oceanic environments throughout the world. Marine ecosystems are in a crisis that is global in scope, rapid in pace, and colossal in scale. In The Tragedy of the Commodity, sociologists Stefano B. Longo, Rebecca Clausen, and Brett Clark explore the role human influence plays in this crisis, highlighting the social and economic forces that are at the heart of this looming ecological problem.
 
In a critique of the classic theory “the tragedy of the commons” by ecologist Garrett Hardin, the authors move beyond simplistic explanations—such as unrestrained self-interest or population growth—to argue that it is the commodification of aquatic resources that leads to the depletion of fisheries and the development of environmentally suspect means of aquaculture. To illustrate this argument, the book features two fascinating case studies—the thousand-year history of the bluefin tuna fishery in the Mediterranean and the massive Pacific salmon fishery. Longo, Clausen, and Clark describe how new fishing technologies, transformations in ships and storage capacities, and the expansion of seafood markets combined to alter radically and permanently these crucial ecosystems. In doing so, the authors underscore how the particular organization of social production contributes to ecological degradation and an increase in the pressures placed upon the ocean. The authors highlight the historical, political, economic, and cultural forces that shape how we interact with the larger biophysical world.
 
A path-breaking analysis of overfishing, The Tragedy of the Commodity yields insight into issues such as deforestation, biodiversity loss, pollution, and climate change.
 
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front cover of Urban Sustainability
Urban Sustainability
A Global Perspective
Igor Vojnovic
Michigan State University Press, 2012

More than half the world’s population currently lives in urban areas, and virtually all of the world’s population growth over the next three decades is expected to be in cities. What impact will this growth have on the environment? What can we do now to pave the way for resource longevity? Sustainability has received considerable attention in recent years, though conceptions of the term remain vague. Using a wide array of cities around the globe as case studies, this timely book explores the varying nature of global urban-environmental stresses and the complexities involved in defining sustainability policies. Working with six core themes, the editor examines the past, present, and future of urban sustainability within local, national, and global contexts.

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front cover of Waste is a Terrible Thing to Mind
Waste is a Terrible Thing to Mind
Risk, Radiation, and Distrust of Government
Weingart, John
Rutgers University Press, 2007

It is an unenviable task, but one that all state governments face: finding a final “resting place” for low-level nuclear waste from power plants, hospitals, university laboratories, and other industries. John Weingart was the official in New Jersey who for many years led this onerous charge. This book is the story of how he and a commission appointed by the governor, instead of imposing a top-down solution, designed an approach that would confront public fears by seeking a community that would volunteer to host a disposal facility. Initially, this novel approach was surprisingly successful, as leaders in a dozen municipalities stepped forward to say they might be interested. Once their interest became known, however, the process in each town derailed. Residents demanded assurances of zero-percent risk and expressed profound distrust of government assertions and promises.

Waste Is a Terrible Thing to Mind is a compelling, suspenseful, and amusing insider’s account of New Jersey policy and politics, but it is also a larger saga of the challenges facing society in the post–9/11 era when the public’s distrust of government is increasing at the same time that its sensitivity to health and safety threats is heightened.

For more information, see:
http://wasteisaterriblethingtomind.com/

"Written with a wry sense of humor, it is a pleasure to read and could provide the blueprint for future efforts to find locations for controversial land uses."
- Marie Curtis, Executive Director, New Jersey Environmental Lobby

"A penetrating look at one state's struggle with radioactive waste ... offering some tantalizing reflections on the public understanding of science and how we, in a democratic society, deal with complexity and uncertainty."
- Jay Kaufman, State Senator, Massachusetts State Legislature

"A provocative story, laced with humor, demonstrates how public distrust of government can make it impotent. It should be read by anyone working on public policy issues, especially planning, growth, and the environment."
- Harriet Keyserling, Former Energy Committee Chair, South Carolina State Legislature

"Readers interested in environmental policy, land use and how governments make decisions will learn much from this fine reflective insider's account. It's also a primer on how to survive and thrive in state government."
- David N. Kinsey, Visiting Professor, Woodrow Wilson School Princeton University

"... a fascinating case study of how a government agency creatively tried to solve an intractable public issue. Although the agency failed in its quest to recruit a town to host a low-level radioactive waste site, Weingart's detailed and often humorous narrative of the agency's efforts is a clear winner."
- Jack Sabatino, Judge, New Jersey Superior Court

"... a very engaging and sometimes discouraging case study about the pitfalls and perils of trying to site a controversial facility the right way."
- Gregg Larson, Administrator, Center for Biometric Research, University of Minnesota

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