cover of book
 

Messengers of Disaster: Raphael Lemkin, Jan Karski, and Twentieth-Century Genocides
by Annette Becker
translated by Käthe Roth
University of Wisconsin Press, 2021
eISBN: 978-0-299-33323-2 | Cloth: 978-0-299-33320-1
Library of Congress Classification HV6322.7.B43513 2021
Dewey Decimal Classification 940.53180922

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Leading up to World War II, two Polish men witnessed the targeted extermination of Jews under Adolf Hitler and the German Reich before the reality of the Holocaust was widely known. Raphael Lemkin, a Jewish lawyer who coined the term "genocide," and Jan Karski, a Catholic member of the Polish resistance, independently shared this knowledge with Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Having heard false rumors of wartime atrocities before, the leaders met the messengers with disbelief and inaction, leading to the eventual murder of more than six million people.

Messengers of Disaster draws upon little-known texts from an array of archives, including the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva and the International Tracing Service in Bad Arolsen. Carrying the knowledge of disaster took a toll on Lemkin and Karski, but their work prepared the way for the United Nations to unanimously adopt the first human rights convention in 1948 and influenced the language we use to talk about genocide today. Annette Becker's detailed study of these two important figures illuminates how distortions of fact can lead people to deny knowledge of what is happening in front of their own eyes.

See other books on: Atrocities | Genocide | Genocide & War Crimes | Poland | World War, 1914-1918
See other titles from University of Wisconsin Press
Nearby on shelf for Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology / Criminology / Crimes and offenses: