cover of book
 

WRITING LETTERS FOR THE BLIND
by GARY FINCKE
The Ohio State University Press, 2003
eISBN: 978-0-8142-8034-8 | Cloth: 978-0-8142-0950-9 | Paper: 978-0-8142-5120-1
Library of Congress Classification PS3556.I457W75 2003
Dewey Decimal Classification 811.54

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK

These poems begin in the coming-of-age moments that change us by forcing recognition of physical weakness, the power of sex, the importance of family, the presence of evil, and the prevalence of mortality. The book opens with narratives taken primarily from childhood and then, divided by long poem sequences, moves to adulthood and confrontation with the identity we acquire through close relationships and the pressures of our appetites, finally ending with what reads as a universal prayer of redemption.


Writing Letters for the Blind presents the reader with visions of this world and all its beauty and sordidness, joy and disappointment. This poet reports the breaking news just in from the heart and soul, and the body as well. “My father has taught me the beatitudes of sight,” Fincke tells us, always aware of what we owe to those who brought us here. He stays up through the starry darkness in the insomnia of one who feels it his duty to pay passionate attention, a poet engaged in “the basic defense of simple things.”


See other books on: American | Poetry
See other titles from The Ohio State University Press
Nearby on shelf for American literature / Individual authors / 1961-2000: