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The Rise of the Cult of Rembrandt: Reinventing an Old Master in Nineteenth-Century France
by Alison McQueen
Amsterdam University Press, 2003
eISBN: 978-90-485-0523-4 | Cloth: 978-90-5356-624-4
Library of Congress Classification N6953.R4M4 2003
Dewey Decimal Classification 709

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Rembrandt's life and art had an almost mythic resonance in nineteenth-century France with artists, critics, and collectors alike using his artistic persona both as a benchmark and as justification for their own goals. This first in-depth study of the traditional critical reception of Rembrandt reveals the preoccupation with his perceived "authenticity," "naturalism," and "naiveté," demonstrating how the artist became an ancestral figure, a talisman with whom others aligned themselves to increase the value of their own work. And in a concluding chapter, the author looks at the play Rembrandt, staged in Paris in 1898, whose production and advertising are a testament to the enduring power of the artist's myth.

See other books on: 1606-1669 | Art criticism | Nineteenth - Century France | Reinventing | Rise
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