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When Peace Is Not Enough: How the Israeli Peace Camp Thinks about Religion, Nationalism, and Justice
by Atalia Omer
University of Chicago Press, 2013
Paper: 978-0-226-00810-3 | eISBN: 978-0-226-00824-0 | Cloth: 978-0-226-00807-3
Library of Congress Classification DS119.76.O46 2013
Dewey Decimal Classification 956.054

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
The state of Israel is often spoken of as a haven for the Jewish people, a place rooted in the story of a nation dispersed, wandering the earth in search of their homeland. Born in adversity but purportedly nurtured by liberal ideals, Israel has never known peace, experiencing instead a state of constant war that has divided its population along the stark and seemingly unbreachable lines of dissent around the relationship between unrestricted citizenship and Jewish identity.
 
By focusing on the perceptions and histories of Israel’s most marginalized stakeholders—Palestinian Israelis, Arab Jews, and non-Israeli Jews—Atalia Omer cuts to the heart of the Israeli-Arab conflict, demonstrating how these voices provide urgently needed resources for conflict analysis and peacebuilding. Navigating a complex set of arguments about ethnicity, boundaries, and peace, and offering a different approach to the renegotiation and reimagination of national identity and citizenship, Omer pushes the conversation beyond the bounds of the single narrative and toward a new and dynamic concept of justice—one that offers the prospect of building a lasting peace.


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