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The Roman Stoics: Self, Responsibility, and Affection
by Gretchen Reydams-Schils
University of Chicago Press, 2005
Paper: 978-0-226-71026-6 | Cloth: 978-0-226-30837-1
Library of Congress Classification B528.R49 2005
Dewey Decimal Classification 188

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Roman Stoic thinkers in the imperial period adapted Greek doctrine to create a model of the self that served to connect philosophical ideals with traditional societal values. The Roman Stoics-the most prominent being Marcus Aurelius-engaged in rigorous self-examination that enabled them to integrate philosophy into the practice of living. Gretchen Reydams-Schils's innovative new book shows how these Romans applied their distinct brand of social ethics to everyday relations and responsibilities.

The Roman Stoics reexamines the philosophical basis that instructed social practice in friendship, marriage, parenting, and community. From this analysis emerge Stoics who were neither cold nor detached, as the stereotype has it, but all too aware of their human weaknesses. In a valuable contribution to current discussions in the humanities on identity, autonomy, and altruism, Reydams-Schils ultimately conveys the wisdom of Stoics to the citizens of modern society.

See other books on: Affection | Responsibility | Reydams-Schils, Gretchen | Self | Stoics
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