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Citizens, Cops, and Power: Recognizing the Limits of Community
by Steve Herbert
University of Chicago Press, 2006
eISBN: 978-0-226-32735-8 | Paper: 978-0-226-32731-0 | Cloth: 978-0-226-32730-3
Library of Congress Classification HN90.C6H47 2006
Dewey Decimal Classification 363.230973

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Politicians, citizens, and police agencies have long embraced community policing, hoping to reduce crime and disorder by strengthening the ties between urban residents and the officers entrusted with their protection. 

That strategy seems to make sense, but in Citizens, Cops, and Power, Steve Herbert reveals the reasons why it rarely, if ever, works. Drawing on data he collected in diverse Seattle neighborhoods from interviews with residents, observation of police officers, and attendance at community-police meetings, Herbert identifies the many obstacles that make effective collaboration between city dwellers and the police so unlikely to succeed. At the same time, he shows that residents’ pragmatic ideas about the role of community differ dramatically from those held by social theorists.

Surprising and provocative, Citizens, Cops, and Power provides a critical perspective not only on the future of community policing, but on the nature of state-society relations as well.

See other books on: Citizen participation | Community | Community life | Criminology | Limits
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