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Dissent in Wichita: The Civil Rights Movement in the Midwest, 1954-72
by Gretchen Cassel Eick
University of Illinois Press, 2001
Cloth: 978-0-252-02683-6 | Paper: 978-0-252-07491-2
Library of Congress Classification F689.W6E75 2001
Dewey Decimal Classification 978.186

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK

On a hot summer evening in 1958, a group of African American students in Wichita, Kansas, quietly entered Dockum's Drug Store and sat down at the whites-only lunch counter. This was the beginning of the first sustained, successful student sit-in of the modern civil rights movement, instigated in violation of the national NAACP's instructions. Based on interviews with over eighty participants and observers of this sit-in, Dissent in Wichita traces the contours of race relations and black activism in an unexpected locus of the civil rights movement, revealing that the movement was a national, not a southern, phenomenon.



See other books on: Civil Rights Movement | Civil rights movements | Dissent | Kansas | Midwest
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