cover of book
 

Women of Color: Mother-Daughter Relationships in 20th-Century Literature
edited by Elizabeth Brown-Guillory
University of Texas Press, 1996
Paper: 978-0-292-70847-1 | eISBN: 978-0-292-79169-5
Library of Congress Classification PS153.M56W66 1996
Dewey Decimal Classification 810.9928708693

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Interest in the mother-daughter relationship has never been greater, yet there are few books specifically devoted to the relationships between daughters and mothers of color. To fill that gap, this collection of original essays explores the mother-daughter relationship as it appears in the works of African, African American, Asian American, Mexican American, Native American, Indian, and Australian Aboriginal women writers. Prominent among the writers considered here are Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Maxine Hong Kingston, Cherríe Moraga, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Amy Tan. Elizabeth Brown-Guillory and the other essayists examine the myths and reality surrounding the mother-daughter relationship in these writers’ works. They show how women writers of color often portray the mother-daughter dyad as a love/hate relationship, in which the mother painstakingly tries to convey knowledge of how to survive in a racist, sexist, and classist world while the daughter rejects her mother’s experiences as invalid in changing social times. This book represents a further opening of the literary canon to twentieth-century women of color. Like the writings it surveys, it celebrates the joys of breaking silence and moving toward reconciliation and growth.
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