cover of book
 

Royal Capitalism: Wealth, Class, and Monarchy in Thailand
by Puangchon Unchanam
University of Wisconsin Press, 2020
eISBN: 978-0-299-32603-6 | Cloth: 978-0-299-32600-5
Library of Congress Classification DS586.U425 2019
Dewey Decimal Classification 959.3044092

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Thanks to its active role in national politics, the market economy, and popular culture, the Thai crown remains both the country's dominant institution and one of the world's wealthiest monarchies. Puangchon Unchanam examines the reign of Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej or Rama IX (1946–2016) and how the crown thrived by transforming itself into a distinctly "bourgeois" monarchy that co-opted middle-class values of hard work, frugality, and self-sufficiency.
The kingdom positioned itself to connect business elites, patronize local industries, and form strategic partnerships with global corporations. Instead of restraining or regulating royal power, white-collar workers joined with the crown to form a dynamic, symbiotic force that has left the lower classes to struggle in their wake. Unchanam presents a surprising case study that kings and queens live long and large in cooperation with the bourgeoisie's interests and ideology.
Nearby on shelf for History of Asia / Southeast Asia / Thailand (Siam):