Klondike Women: True Tales of the 1897–1898 Gold Rush
by Melanie J. Mayer
Ohio University Press, 1989
Cloth: 978-0-8040-0926-3 | Paper: 978-0-8040-0927-0
Library of Congress Classification F1095.K5M29 1989
Dewey Decimal Classification 971.91

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Klondike Women is a compelling collection of historical photographs and first-hand accounts of the adventures, challenges, and disappointments of women on the trails to the Klondike gold fields. In the midst of a depression near the turn of the twentieth century, these women dared to act on the American dream. As they journeyed through the Northwest wilderness, they explored and extended not only the physical frontiers of North America but also the social frontiers about the “women’s place.”

Challenging the myth that the only women who participated in gold rushes were prostitutes and gold-diggers of the euphemistic sort, Melanie Mayer shows us that Klondike women came from all walks of life—socialites to poor immigrants, single women, wives, widows, and children. They planned to make their money through many different undertakings including mining, business, entertainment, professional, and service enterprises. Their approaches to life were as varied as their roles—optimistic or skeptical; cautious or adventuresome; gregarious or self-contained; contemplative or active. There was no typical Klondike woman. Individually, their stories can be funny, hopeful, tragic, or poignant. Taken together, they give rich, complex images of the people, times, and places of the gold rush.

A visually exciting book, Klondike Women features over 150 photographs and illustrations. This volume should appeal not only to the general reader, but to those interested in history, women’s studies, and the Pacific Northwest as well.

See other books on: Frontier and pioneer life | Gold discoveries | Mining | Women pioneers | Yukon
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